Published on
by

A Dozen Google Employees Resign Over Pentagon Drone Contract as 4,000 Workers Demand End to Project

"At some point, I realized I could not in good faith recommend anyone join Google, knowing what I knew. I realized if I can't recommend people join here, then why am I still here?"

A dozen Google employees have resigned and more than 4,000 have signed a petition in protest of their company's involvement in a Pentagon contract to analyze imagery, potentially to improve the targeting of drone strikes. (Photo: yournewswire.com)

About a dozen Google employees have resigned in protest of the tech giant's involvement in an artificial intelligence (AI) collaboration with the U.S. military, in which Google is participating to develop new kinds of drone technology.

"At some point, I realized I could not in good faith recommend anyone join Google, knowing what I knew," one of the workers told Gizmodo. "I realized if I can't recommend people join here, then why am I still here?"

The resignations follow Google's failure to alter course despite approximately 4,000 of its employees signing a petition that urgesGoogle to abandon its work with Project Maven, a Pentagon program focused on the targeting systems of the military's armed drones. The company is reportedly contributing artificial intelligence technology to the program.

"We cannot outsource the moral responsibility of our technologies to third parties," wrote the employees in the petition. "Google's stated values make this clear: Every one of our users is trusting us. Never jeopardize that. Ever. This contract puts Google's reputation at risk and stands in direct opposition to our core values. Building this technology to assist the U.S. Government in military surveillance—and potentially lethal outcomes—is not acceptable."

The petition has also gained the support of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the International Committee for Robot Arms Control (ICRAC).

"We cannot outsource the moral responsibility of our technologies to third parties...Building this technology to assist the U.S. Government in military surveillance—and potentially lethal outcomes—is not acceptable." —Google employees

"Companies like Google, as well as their counterparts around the world, must consider the consequences and demand real accountability and standards of behaviour from the military agencies that seek their expertise—and from themselves," said Cindy Cohn and Peter Eckersley of EFF last month.

The petition stressed that "Google should not be in the business of war" and demanded that executives draft and release a clear policy stating that "neither Google nor its contractors will ever build warfare technology"—warning that a failure to do so would harm Google's ability to attract and retain talent. The resignation of several employees indicates a new level of commitment among some workers regarding their objections to the project.

The employees who have decided to leave Google were praised on social media for their "ethical activism” on Wednesday.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do. Without Your Support We Simply Don't Exist.

Share This Article