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Proving Revolution Has Roots, Vast Majority of Dems Back Major Sanders Role

"Election days come and go but political revolutions are not dependent on election days," says Bernie Sanders

At a press conference in Burlington, Vermont on Sunday, Sanders called for a "50-state strategy to revitalize American democracy at the local, state and federal level." (Screenshot)

Reflecting widespread support for his progressive campaign proposals, more than three-quarters of Democrats say presidential candidate Bernie Sanders should have a "major role" in shaping the party's positions, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos poll released Sunday.

The survey was conducted June 7-10—right after Hillary Clinton became the presumptive Democratic nominee—and also found a full two-thirds in support of Clinton picking Sanders as her vice-presidential running mate. Sanders himself dismissed that idea as "very unlikely" in an interview on Sunday.

"In primary after primary and state after state, we have received by significant margins the support of young people, which tells me that our vision is in fact that vision of the United States."
—Bernie Sanders

Bolstered by millions of votes, record campaign contributions, and the support of close to 1,900 delegates, Sanders has said he intends to push for a bold progressive agenda ahead of and during the Democratic National Convention in July.

On Sunday, after an "exciting and productive" meeting with a handful of his closest supporters, Sanders said, "We are taking this campaign and our ideas for a strong platform to transform the Democratic Party away from a party that spends far too much time raising money for wealthy people into a party which represents the grassroots of this country."

He reminded reporters that "election days come and go but political revolutions are not dependent on election days," and expressed pride that "in primary after primary and state after state, we have received by significant margins the support of young people, which tells me that our vision is in fact that vision of the United States."

To that end, Sanders said, "What we need is a 50-state strategy, which engages people, young people, working people to stand up and run for school board, to run for city council, to run for state legislature, to revitalize American democracy at the local, state and federal level. Demand that government starts listening to ordinary people rather than campaign contributors."

Watch his full remarks below:

Two-thirds of respondents to the Reuters/Ipsos poll also said Sanders should endorse Clinton.

The rival candidates are meeting in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday evening, after the district holds the final primary of the nominating season.

"We will be chatting about her campaign," Sanders said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press."

"I simply want to get a sense of what kind of platform she will be supporting, whether she will be vigorous in standing up for working families and the middle class, moving aggressively in climate change, healthcare for all, making public colleges and universities tuition-free," he said. "And after we have that kind of discussion and after we can determine whether or not we are going to have a strong and progressive platform, I will be able to make other decisions."

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