Michelle Chen

Michelle Chen is a contributing editor at In These Times. She is a regular contributor to the labor rights blog Working In These Times, Colorlines.com, and Pacifica's WBAI. Her work has also appeared in Common Dreams, Alternet, Ms. Magazine, Newsday, and her old zine, cain.

Articles by this author

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Friday, December 13, 2013
Teachers Seek to ‘Reclaim’ Education
After years of being backed into a corner, on Monday public-school teachers stood up in defiance against what they see as their chief bully—budget-slashing school reforms that have made school more stressful and less fulfilling f
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Saturday, December 07, 2013
‘From Bean to Cup,’ Starbucks Labor Action Heats Up
The Starbucks cup, with its iconic green mermaid logo and smart cardboard sleeve, seems to embody the essence of the urbane yuppie lifestyle.
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Saturday, November 23, 2013
Qatar’s World Cup Spectacle Brought to You by Slavery
The big controversies surrounding Qatar as the site of the 2022 World Cup have been the shady bidding process and fears that the desert heat will ruin the soccer games.
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Sunday, November 17, 2013
From U.S. to Philippines, Nurses Mobilize in Typhoon Haiyan’s Wake
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Saturday, November 16, 2013
How Sandy Clean-Up Brought Day Laborers Out of the Shadows
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Saturday, November 09, 2013
Exploitation Remains the Name of the Game at Dell’s Chinese Factories
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Saturday, October 26, 2013
Guitar Center Workers Rock the Shop Floor
If your 9-to-5 job revolves around your life’s passion, the satisfaction of being surrounded by what you love can offset the daily grind.
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Thursday, October 24, 2013
Minimum-Wage Hike Won’t Appease Bangladeshi Workers
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Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Educators Wary of Tech Fixes for College Affordability Crisis
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Sunday, October 13, 2013
Migrant Women Bring Voices to Capital
Adareli Ponce is a typical working woman in America, but her work experience is not typically "American." Even though the products of the labor of women like her are everywhere, her story is invisible to many. As the main provider for her family back in Hidalgo, Mexico, the 31-year-old has spent years slogging away in U.S. chocolate and seafood processing facilities. Migration was her chance to escape the entrenched poverty that ensnares so many young women in her hometown, who she says are often excluded from sustainable job opportunities.
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