Marty Jezer

Marty Jezer

Marty Jezer  was a well-known Vermont activist and author. Born Martin Jezer and raised in the Bronx, he earned a history degree from Lafayette College. He was a co-founding member of the Working Group on Electoral Democracy, and co-authored influential model legislation on campaign finance reform that has so far been adopted by Maine and Arizona. He was involved in state and local politics, as a campaign worker for Bernie Sanders, Vermont's Independent Congressional Representative, and as a columnist and Town Representative. Jezer had been an influential figure in progressive politics from the 1960s to the time of his death. He was editor of WIN magazine (Workshop In Nonviolence), from 1962-8, was a writer for Liberation News Service (LNS), and was active in the nuclear freeze movement, and the organic farming movement (he helped found the Natural Organic Farmers' Association). Marty died in 2005.

Articles by this author

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Friday, January 25, 2002
Enron's Fall: FDR's Ghost
When the Enron story first broke, Vice President's Cheney's spin-mistress, Mary Matalin, dismissed it as unimportant. Referring to Bill Clinton's Monica Lewinsky scandal (which really was unimportant), it doesn't even involve a "blue dress," she insisted. But the Enron scandal is important; and not...
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Friday, November 30, 2001
Nicaraguan Lesson
One of the more telling events of the post-September 11th period was the recent election in Nicaragua. With the media focused on Afghanistan, it was virtually ignored in the American press. My sources for this commentary are British newspapers, especially The Guardian, and the Agence France-Presse...
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Friday, October 05, 2001
My City
It's not a city I like to visit. Nor would I ever again want to live there. It's too crowded, too expensive, too noisy and too big for this spoiled, transplanted small-town Vermonter. But I lived my first and most formative years there, still read its newspapers and root for its teams. Whenever I...
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