James Carroll

James Carroll

James Carroll, a TomDispatch regular and former Boston Globe columnist, is the author of 20 books, including the new novel The Cloister (Doubleday). Among other works are: House of War: The Pentagon and the Disastrous Rise of American Power and Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age. His memoir, An American Requiem, won the National Book Award. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives in Boston with his wife, the writer Alexandra Marshall.

 

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, January 09, 2001
Black Caucus Sends a Message About Justice
THE AMERICAN Heritage Dictionary defines ''epiphany'' as a ''sudden manifestation of the essence or meaning of something.'' Last Saturday was the Christian feast of the Epiphany - Three Kings Day - but on that day an equally dramatic manifestation occurred in the chamber of the United States Congress. Electoral College votes for president and vice president were solemnly registered, sealing the ascendancy of George W. Bush and Richard Cheney.
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Tuesday, January 02, 2001
A Quiet Reminder: We're All in This Together
SO THE CALENDAR rolls on. If the passage of time is the only certain thing, why are you surprised again to find that yet another year has turned, and with it - now for sure - another millennium.
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Tuesday, December 19, 2000
A Time for Senator Kennedy
EVENTS OF THE LAST month represent a return of fiercely felt American partisanship - and that is good. The most damaging aspect of the Gore-Bush election campaign was the blurring of differences that both candidates sponsored. As a result, major matters of social policy, military assumptions, and foreign affairs were never debated.
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Tuesday, November 21, 2000
Clinton's Missed Opportunity in Vietnam
"THE HISTORY WE leave behind is painful and hard," President Clinton said in Vietnam last week. "We must not forget it, but we must not be controlled by it." Americans were too obsessed with the counting of votes in Florida to take much note of Clinton's visit to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, an event which in another context, might have struck deep chords in our national psyche.
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Tuesday, June 20, 2000
The Truth About NATO's Air War
One year ago dust was still rising from the rubble of the NATO air war against the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. From March 24, 1999, until June 10, 1999, Operation Allied Force conducted 38,000 combat sorties, including more than 10,000 strike sorties - an explosion of violence that sparked furious debate. Those opposed to the NATO bombardment were vilified as friends of genocide, while its supporters clung to a self-justifying vision of humanitarian war.
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Tuesday, May 02, 2000
Emerson, Thoreau, and the Walk for Hunger
In 1837, an economic bust hit New York, impoverishing many. A family of hard-working bakers responded by giving their bread away to the hungry. They were the Hecker brothers, and the youngest of them, 18-year-old Isaac, was changed forever by the experience. His story, beginning with that gift of bread, continues this coming Sunday as 40,000 people embark on the 31st annual Walk for Hunger in Boston.
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Tuesday, March 28, 2000
Bill Clinton's Next Life?
What becomes of Bill Clinton? With the shape of the race to succeed him established, this most political of presidents moves to the margin of domestic public discourse. In less than a year, he is a man without a job. Yet Americans, accustomed to thinking of their nation's presidency as the world pinnacle, may be in for a surprise. Clinton's future could outweigh his past.
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Tuesday, March 07, 2000
Pittsburgh's Joe Healy: A Man Of Hope Gunned Down
Youthful hope and a shared commitment make strong bonds of friendship, and then they make grief especially pointed. But the grief requires a recovery of the hope and a new commitment. Let me explain.
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Tuesday, February 29, 2000
A Tale Of Two War Veterans: John McCain And Phil Berrigan
John McCain's widely irresistible story does not begin with his valiant record as a prisoner of war. Nor is its most compelling aspect his role in bringing about an end to the punitive US embargo against Vietnam, although both accomplishments have stirred admiration in unlikely breasts, including mine. Rather, the episode that starts the McCain saga is one that few, including the senator himself apparently, have much reflected upon, yet it points to the most important - and troubling - aspect of this man's character.
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Tuesday, February 08, 2000
America's 21st-Century Gulag
In taking the measure of the European conquest of the New World, when so many indigenous people were eliminated by sword, gunfire, and disease, we note that the invading Europeans did not practice human sacrifice. The Aztecs, for all their high-culture accomplishments, routinely offered up live human beings to appease their gods. The cult was so brutal that the conquistadors, by comparison, could think of themselves as a civilizing force.
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