James Carroll

James Carroll

James Carroll a former Boston Globe columnist, is the author of 20 books, including the new novel "The Cloister" (Doubleday). Among other works are: "House of War: The Pentagon and the Disastrous Rise of American Power" and "Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age." His memoir, "An American Requiem: God, My Father, and the War That Came Between Us," won the National Book Award. His forthcoming book (2021) is "The Truth at the Heart of the Lie: How the Catholic Church Lost Its Soul." He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives in Boston with his wife, the writer Alexandra Marshall.

Articles by this author

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Thursday, October 17, 2002
Threshold of a New Era
THAT AN OFFICIAL of the Federal Republic of Germany was sacked last month for comparing George W. Bush to Adolf Hitler was proper, but not because of the insult to Bush. The extremity of Hitler's malevolence must always be insisted upon. Whatever one's problems with Bush, it banalizes evil to equate him with the author of the Final Solution. Germans must be particularly careful not to do this.
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Tuesday, October 01, 2002
The President's Nuclear Threat
''THE NATIONAL Security Strategy of the United States,'' the document published by the Bush administration last week, explains the rush to war, lays bare how much more dangerous the world is under President Bush, and shows that neither he nor his advisers understand the history they have lived through.
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Tuesday, July 30, 2002
The Culture of Self-Deception
''MY DEAR FELLOW citizens,'' Vaclav Havel said in his inaugural address as Czech president, ''for 40 years on this day you heard from my predecessors the same thing in a number of variations: how our country is flourishing, how many millions of tons of steel we produce, how happy we all are, how we trust our government, and what prospects lie ahead of us. I assume you did not propose me for this office so that I, too, should lie to you.''
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Tuesday, July 23, 2002
Questions on Bush's War on Iraq
WE AMERICANS find ourselves in the extraordinary position of witnessing our government's slow but certain movement toward a major war with Iraq.
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Tuesday, May 28, 2002
We Must All Prevent War
THE SHOCK OF headlines leaves us unable to distinguish between the merely awful and a world historic threat. The Catholic crisis and even the war on terrorism will be mere footnotes to the present age if the conflict between India and Pakistan moves from border skirmishing to general war. As the prospect of such escalation grows more likely by the day, here are several points deserving of renewed emphasis:
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Tuesday, April 23, 2002
The Quiet After the Siege
JERUSALEM -- ALWAYS A CITY to send bolts of recognition through your mind, Jerusalem is even more electric now, but in a ghostly way.
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Tuesday, March 12, 2002
America as Sparta
WHEN DID ATHENS become Sparta? When did America redefine itself so profoundly around war?
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Tuesday, March 05, 2002
Bush's Bunker Presidency
MY FATHER was a senior Pentagon official during the Cuban Missile Crisis in the autumn of 1963. My family lived at Bolling Air Force Base in Washington on a street known as ''Generals' Row.'' Our neighbors were the top officers of the Air Force, and during the heat of the showdown with the Soviets my father and his colleagues did not come home for days on end.
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Tuesday, February 19, 2002
Bush's Radical Shift in Military Policy
GEORGE W. BUSH is widely regarded as the avatar of a conservative restoration, but he is the opposite. This presidency marks a radical overthrow of traditional American values and policies. Civil liberties are obviously at issue in the new regime of homeland security, but the most drastic shift involves American attitudes toward war.
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Tuesday, February 05, 2002
A Buildup in Search of an Enemy
THE DEFEAT of Hitler, coming only weeks after the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt, marked the end of one era and the beginning of another, when the Soviet Union went immediately from being America's indispensable partner to being America's nemesis.
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