James Carroll

James Carroll

James Carroll, a TomDispatch regular and former Boston Globe columnist, is the author of 20 books, including the new novel The Cloister (Doubleday). Among other works are: House of War: The Pentagon and the Disastrous Rise of American Power and Christ Actually: The Son of God for the Secular Age. His memoir, An American Requiem, won the National Book Award. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He lives in Boston with his wife, the writer Alexandra Marshall.

 

Articles by this author

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Monday, November 07, 2005
Deconstructing Cheney
The Indictment of the vice president's chief of staff for perjury and obstruction of justice is an occasion to consider just how damaging the long public career of Richard Cheney has been to the United States. He began as a political scientist devoted to caring for the elbow of Donald Rumsfeld.
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Monday, October 17, 2005
All God, All the Time
When they told us in Sunday School that God is everywhere, they could have been talking about the recent news cycle. With Harriet Miers, we see that God lives in the politics of the US Supreme Court nomination process. In a culture defined by the separation of church and state, President Bush and his allies have mastered the use of religious affirmation as a deflection not only of criticism, but of critical thought. God is thus a trump card, a free pass.
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Monday, October 10, 2005
The Labyrinth of Iraq
THE ANCIENT myth has it that a person entering the maze will never find the way out. As if that were not terrifying enough, inside the maze lives the beast whose special appetite is for the young. The maze is a cluster of tricks, paths to nowhere, the realm of dead ends. There is no escape. The young must fear being eaten alive, but an eternity of false exits threatens everyone.
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Monday, September 26, 2005
Lessons From a Fallen Empire
ROME - To be in Rome is to stand, as it were, before a canyon wall on which the tell-tale marks were made by human hands instead of wind, sun, and rain. The primordial world lives in the ruined Forum, the stripped-to-the-brick facades of temples and theaters, the surviving arches of long-gone aqueducts and imperial palaces.
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Monday, September 12, 2005
Church, State, and Katrina
The disaster on the Gulf Coast is the occasion for public prayer. President Bush invites the nation this week to place the victims of Katrina in the hands of an all-loving God, an impulse many of us share. In Boston and other cities, religious figures have been at the forefront of welcome expressions of concern. On the scene of the catastrophe itself, religious organizations have provided heroic relief, often in stark contrast to hesitant government agencies.
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Monday, September 05, 2005
Katrina's Truths
Labor Day is the true American New Year's, the day of fresh beginnings -- and this year it's just in time. The broader culture takes its cue from school children, who leave the house this week believing in possibility itself. We, their parents and grandparents, need the reminder that change for the better is the business of human life. Change for the worse, alas, has been the rule of the season past, which is why the time is ripe for something new.
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Tuesday, June 14, 2005
Nixon's Madman Strategy
"I call it the madman theory, Bob," Richard Nixon said to Robert Haldeman. With the recent revelation of the identity of ''Deep Throat," the nation's memory has been cast back to the Watergate crisis, which began with a burglary 33 years ago this week. Nixon is remembered as having threatened the US Constitution, but his presidency represented a far graver threat than that. Various published tapes have put on display his vulgarity, pettiness, and prejudice and his regular drunkenness.
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Tuesday, May 03, 2005
America's Mortal Secret
The holiest acreage in America was consecrated in an act of revenge. Beating a retreat back to Washington from their defeat at the First Battle of Bull Run, Union soldiers crossed into the property of ''Arlington House," Robert E. Lee's home on the Potomac River. They buried the remains of their dead comrades in Mrs. Lee's rose garden. From then on, the Confederate leader's estate was used as a Union graveyard -- a vindictive payback. The place is now known as Arlington National Cemetery.
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Tuesday, April 12, 2005
Far from Texas, in Dire Need
George Bush and Ariel Sharon have the love of ranches in common. Each man uses his spread in the rough country as a retreat and as a symbol of identity. Ranchers are plainspoken men of the simple verities. Ranchers are tough. Ranchers know how to stand alone. But what they really love about the spread is the open view. Yesterday, Bush and Sharon met at the Texas ranch. Yet the scene on which their eyes fell was not pretty.
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Tuesday, March 29, 2005
Spring's Mystery
A soft rain is falling outside the window. Drops of water glisten on the branches and twigs. Each drop, you see now, clings to a bud, magnifying the tiny crimson knots, which are the year's way of saying -- the spring returns. Leaves are being born. Blossoms exist already, inside their tiny shells. Life begins anew. The tree's job, with the rain's help, is to show it. Your job is to notice.
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