Gary Younge

Gary Younge is editor-at-large for the Guardian. He was based in the U.S. for 12 years before recently returning to London. He also writes a monthly column, “Beneath the Radar,” for the Nation magazine and is the Alfred Knobler Fellow for the Nation Institute. His new book is Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives (Nation Books).

Articles by this author

Views
Monday, January 30, 2012
US Elections: No Matter Who You Vote For, Money Always Wins
Republican presidential debates are not for the faint-hearted. Last week in Jacksonville, Florida, Rick Santorum warned of the "threat of radical Islam growing" in Central and South America. Newt Gingrich advocated sending up to seven flights a day to the moon, where private industry might set up a colony, and reaffirmed his claim that Palestinians were invented in the late 70s.
Read more
Views
Monday, January 16, 2012
For Too Many African-Americans, Prison is a Legacy Passed from Father to Son
According to Jeffrey Gamble, the luckiest day of his life was when his car hit the kerb at the corner of Jefferson and National in Los Angeles while he was drunk-driving. It flew over a fence, falling 80ft into a creek below, leaving him with a broken neck and paralysed. "If I hadn't had that accident, I would be dead – or in jail for the rest of my life, just like my brothers," says Gamble, 47. Prison, for the Gambles, is as common a destination as university might be for a middle-class family. His two brothers are both in jail.
Read more
Views
Monday, January 02, 2012
US Primaries Promise Little – and 2012 Could Deliver Even Less
'They are in a terminal panic," said Pat Buchanan in February 1996 of the Republican establishment, as his insurgent campaign against Senate leader Bob Dole gathered pace. "All the knights and barons will be riding into the castle pulling up the drawbridge in a minute. All the peasants are coming with pitchforks. We're going to take this over the top." By March his campaign was suspended.
Read more
Views
Monday, December 19, 2011
The US is Blind to the Price of War That is Still Being Borne by the Iraqi People
On 19 November 2005 a US marine squad was struck by a roadside bomb in Haditha, in Iraq's Anbar province, killing one soldier and seriously injuring two others. According to civilians they then went on the rampage, slaughtering 24 people. They included a 76-year-old man in a wheelchair and a three-year-old child. It was a massacre .
Read more
Views
Friday, December 09, 2011
Land of the Free, Home of the Hungry
On Monday afternoon this week, Rachelle Grimmer went into a Department of Health and Human Services in Texas with her two children, Timothy, aged 10, and Ramie, aged 12, and asked for a new case worker who could assist her application for food stamps.
Read more
Views
Monday, November 07, 2011
Who Knows Where the Occupations Are Going – It's Just Great to Be Moving
On the night of 28 October, more than 100 Tennessee highway patrolmen made their way down the steps of Nashville's war memorial in single file.
Read more
Views
Monday, August 01, 2011
The Reckless Right in the US Is Forgetting the Basics of Participation
While campaigning for the Democratic nomination in 2007, Barack Obama sought to sympathise with the farmers of Adel, Iowa, (population 4,653) over the discrepancy between how much they earned for their crops and the price in the stores. " Anybody gone into Whole Foods lately and see what they charge for arugula ?" he asked, referring to a high end organic chain. "I mean, they're charging a lot of money for this stuff."
Read more
Views
Monday, July 18, 2011
As the US Nears the Brink, The Budget Row is Exposing GOP Madness
Back in 2004 I met a pleasant Republican called Burton Kephart , who had lost his son in Iraq and wanted to save my soul.
Read more
Views
Monday, May 23, 2011
Europe's Obamaphilia says More about its Own Weakness than the US President
In his book Audacity of Hope , Barack Obama described himself as a Rorschach test – the famous psychological experiment where people are shown a series of ink blots and asked to identify what they see in them. There is no right answer.
Read more
Views
Monday, May 09, 2011
The "Humanitarian" Bombing of Libya
'Despite the enormous power of the American government," argued the renowned Trinidadian intellectual and activist CLR James in 1950, "its spokesman, the man on whom it depends and has depended for years to give some dignity and colour to its international politics, is an Englishman, Winston Churchill."
Read more

Pages