Ebony Slaughter-Johnson

Ebony Slaughter-Johnson

Ebony Slaughter-Johnson is a Next Leader at the Institute for Policy Studies. She researches history and the criminalization of poverty.

Articles by this author

Beyond the obvious racist underpinnings of these incidents lurks something far more sinister: the rise of racially motivated vigilantism. (Photo: Shutterstock) Views
Thursday, September 06, 2018
‘Stand Your Ground’ Laws Encourage Dangerous Vigilantism
This summer featured at least a dozen stories of black Americans across the country having the police called on them for little or no reason at all. Famously, two black men in Philadelphia were arrested while simply waiting for a friend at a Starbucks. Then the police were called on a black family...
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Wednesday, July 04, 2018
Poverty Won’t ‘Make America Great’
This summer, UN special rapporteur on extreme poverty Philip Alston presented his observations on the state of international poverty to the UN Human Rights Council. The country at the center of his most recent report wasn’t a developing one — it was the United States. In one of the wealthiest...
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"To the law, Arpaio is a convicted criminal who built his career on denying the constitutional and human rights of the most vulnerable among us. To Trump, he’s “a patriot” who kept “Arizona safe.” Views
Wednesday, August 30, 2017
Trump’s Pardon Of Joe Arpaio Is Deeply Disturbing
During a speech to a group of police officers in July, President Trump returned to one of his favorite themes of the campaign season: violence . “Please don’t be too nice” to the “thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon,” Trump advised the officers. Be “rough.” The president’s endorsement...
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Thursday, May 11, 2017
American Justice Now Feels Laughable
Heard any good jokes lately? Desiree Fairooz did. But laughing at it got her thrown in jail. That’s right: Fairooz was just convicted for laughing during the confirmation hearing of now-Attorney General Jeff Sessions in January 2017. She’d attended the hearing, in her own words , to “oppose his...
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Wednesday, December 21, 2016
Calling Working People of All Colors
A little over 80 years ago, NAACP founder W.E.B. Du Bois wrote “ Black Reconstruction in America ,” a groundbreaking essay that looked at the racial politics of the post-Civil War years. The major failure of those years, Du Bois insisted, was that poor whites and poor blacks failed to form an...
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Wednesday, July 13, 2016
Still Second-Class Citizens
When I heard about the police shootings of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, I thought back to another name etched into American history: Dred Scott. In 1857, the Supreme Court was tasked with deciding whether Scott, an African American man born into slavery, should be granted his freedom. The...
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Monday, November 30, 2015
A Black Woman’s Response to Marginalization at Princeton
Professing themselves to be “sick and tired of being sick and tired,” student activists at my alma mater, Princeton University, passionately and powerfully challenged the university in recent days to make certain changes to improve the experience of Black students. They demanded, in the same vein...
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