Ai-jen Poo

Ai-jen Poo

Ai-jen Poo is is the director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, co-director of Caring Across Generations and a 2014 MacArthur fellow. Follow her on Twitter: @AiJenPoo

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, March 07, 2017
DayWithoutAWoman: For Domestic and Low-Wage Workers, the Stakes Are Higher Than Ever
I sometimes ask domestic workers to imagine what would happen if every nanny, housecleaner and home care worker in the country decided to go on strike for one day. I ask them to reflect on all the children, seniors, and families who would be touched, and then to think about how those families’...
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Tuesday, November 08, 2016
The Case Against Cynicism: A Dispatch from Colorado and Florida
We live in an age of cynicism. We’re not going to tell you what others might — which is that cynicism is a privilege. While it is true that some people don’t have the same set of options or resources to sit elections out given what’s at stake for them and their families, we’re going to take a...
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Saturday, November 05, 2016
From the Kitchen Table to the Voting Booth
The last time I saw Gloria Steinem, she said something that stayed with me. She said, “the voting booth is the one place in America where everyone is equal.” No matter who you are, where you come from, what you look like, once you vote, your vote counts. And no one vote counts more than another...
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Thursday, November 03, 2016
In This Hate-Filled Election, There’s Always Love
Some couples, in the days leading up to their wedding, are caught up in final preparations: a last-minute dance class, attending to a late RSVP, or doing some work on your vows. There are lots of details, but what matters most is the love you share. We’re getting married on November 18, and there’s...
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Sunday, February 08, 2015
The Age of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America
The following is an excerpt from Ai-jen Poo’s new book , The Age of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America My father’s father, Liang Shao Pu, lived to the age of 93. A lifelong student and then teacher of tai chi and a die-hard Wheel of Fortune fan, he had a slow, deep‑throated...
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Monday, September 29, 2014
America's Most Invisible Workforce Is the One We Need the Most
I started organizing domestic workers 16 years ago. I signed up nannies, housekeepers and home health aides at parks and train stations as they quietly took care of our children, our households and our elders. Many of them had no clue about labor laws or their rights as workers – they struggled to...
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