Sanders Surrogate Nina Turner Considering Green Party's VP Offer

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Sanders Surrogate Nina Turner Considering Green Party's VP Offer

Former Ohio state senator will reportedly decide before the Green Party convention, which starts later this week

Former Ohio state senator Nina Turner became a highly visible Bernie Sanders surrogate during the primary campaign. (Photo: AFGE/flickr/cc)

Coming off a contentious week at the Democratic National Convention, Bernie Sanders surrogate and former Ohio state senator Nina Turner is reportedly considering an offer to run for vice president on the Green Party's national ticket.

The former Cleveland city councilor and high-level Ohio Democratic Party official, who switched her support from Hillary Clinton to Sanders in November 2015, told Cleveland.com on Sunday night that she was weighing the ask from the party's presumptive presidential nominee Jill Stein and would decide "in the coming days."

"It's true," Turner confirmed to the Washington Post. "Talking with my family. There's nothing to tell at this point."

The Green Party convention takes place in Houston, Texas, from August 4-7.

Turner, who was sharply critical of the Democratic establishment during the primary campaign, had planned to deliver a speech nominating Sanders for president last week's Democratic convention. She was barred—without explanation—from doing so. In turn, Sanders supporters chastised the Democratic establishment for trying to "silence" Turner, creating an #ImWithNina hashtag and speaking out in her defense.

In the wake of the debacle, Stein tweeted:

For her part, during a keynote speech delivered during the People's Convention—a gathering held just ahead of the Democrats' convention, designed to look beyond this year's presidential race—Turner reportedly encouraged voters to check out other parties, including the Green Party and the Libertarian Party.

"This nation needs people from all walks of life like those of us in this room today to be able to stand up and speak truth to power and not be afraid," she said. "Both major political parties need people like us in this room to keep us honest and keep them on task. If we truly are a representative democracy where everyone's voice matters, we shouldn't be afraid of a little competition."

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