Two-out-of-Three Tuesday as Sanders Revolution Proves Resilient Strength

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Two-out-of-Three Tuesday as Sanders Revolution Proves Resilient Strength

Though Clinton claims delegate prize in Arizona, Utah and Idaho 'Feel the Bern'... big time

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders waves to the crowd as he prepares to speak to thousands of supporters at the downtown convention center Tuesday, March 22. (Photo: Hayne Palmour IV — San Diego Union-Tribune)

Bernie Sanders proved that his call for political revolution does, in fact, have strength in the western states by winning two out of three contests on Tuesday.

Sanders won Idaho with 78 percent of the vote compared to Clinton's 21 percent. In Utah, the gap was even larger, with Sanders holding 80 percent of the vote to Clinton's 20 percent.

While rival Hillary Clinton met expectations in Arizona's closed primary where she bested Sanders by a margin of 58 to 40 percentage points, Sanders walloped the national frontrunner in open caucuses in both Utah and Idaho with huge margins of nearly 60 percentage points in both states.

According to CNN's figures early Wednesday morning, Sanders won Idaho with 78 percent of the vote compared to Clinton's 21 percent. In Utah, the gap was even larger, with Sanders holding 80 percent of the vote to Clinton's 20 percent.

Though his pair of victories in Utah and Idaho had yet to be officially announced, Sanders spoke to supporters on Tuesday night to thank all those who have responded to his call for re-ordering the political status quo in the country.

"When we began this campaign, we were considered a fringe candidacy," Sanders said. "Well, 10 months later we have now won 10 primaries and caucuses and unless I'm very mistaken, we're gonna win a couple more tonight."

Watch the full speech:

Sanders spoke for more than one hour to the estimated crowd of 10,000 people. As the San Diego Tribune reports:

[Sanders] gave shout-out appeals to numerous groups, saying his campaign was listening to young people, disabled veterans, senior citizens, Latinos, African Americans, Native Americans, women, gays, unauthorized immigrants and the economically disadvantaged.

Sanders pledged to make the “rigged economy” fair and redirect much of the spending on wars to address problems at home.

“Together we are going to change the national priorities of this country,” he shouted, his voice going hoarse. “Together we are going to invest in our communities. Together we are gong to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure and create millions of jobs.”

He also lashed out in familiar fashion at various foes, including the billionaire-class, Wall Street, pharmaceutical companies, the Walmart-owning Walton family, vote-suppressing Republican governors, Donald Trump and, on campaign finance, Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

He said the country is “living under a corrupt campaign finance system, which is undermining American democracy” because billionaires spend to elect those “who represent the wealthy and the powerful.”

Sanders said his campaign was about pursuing “an economy that works for all of us, not just the one percent.”

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