Saul Landau

Saul Landau is an Institute for Policy Studies fellow and an internationally known scholar, author, commentator, and filmmaker on foreign and domestic policy issues. His latest book is A Bush and Botox World (2006, Counterpunch Press).

Articles by this author

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Friday, May 24, 2013 - 7:06am
Take Syria Seriously—And Stay Out
Syria’s civil war has inspired some in Congress and in the media. Stupidity or insanity? Some people don’t learn from past mistakes. Why start another body count in a Middle East conflict with no direct relationship to U.S. security?
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Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 3:10pm
The Right Path for Washington in Syria
The Syrian conflict continued to boil - or boil over - when Syrian troops fired across the Turkish border on April 9, apparently killing either fleeing refugees or armed combatants.
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Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 7:13am
Get Serious About Syria: US Entanglement Making Matters Worse
The Syrian conflict continued to boil – or boil over – when Syrian troops fired across the Turkish border on April 9, apparently killing either fleeing refugees or armed combatants. However, despite continued words of caution from the Pentagon and White House about getting into another messy Middle East war, Secretary of State Hilary Clinton pressed for more intervention. The Syrian Accountability Act of 2003 began the formal U.S.
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Monday, March 12, 2012 - 12:02pm
Malice Versus Nobility: On Scooter Libby and Bradley Manning
After 9/11, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, a Yale graduate with a law degree from Columbia, and fellow neo cons plotted to twist and invent "intelligence" data to convince the public that Saddam Hussein possessed weapons of mass destruction, so as to build a case for invading Iraq.
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Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 8:57am
Free Private Manning
In April, the Army transferred Private Bradley Manning from solitary confinement at Quantico, Virginia to the federal prison at Leavenworth, Kansas. At Quantico, according to a Human Rights Watch report, the military had shackled Manning, stripped him naked, and isolated him. The government attributed this cruel treatment to their fears that Manning might commit suicide.
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Saturday, April 30, 2011 - 12:28pm
Same Old from the Nuclear Gang after Fukushima
The nuclear industry has promised the world cheap, safe, and clean energy for over 60 years. As the Japanese government continues to extend its nuclear evacuation zone around the Daiichi nuclear complex in Fukushima, the pushers of nuclear power--including President Barack Obama--still demand that Congress approve ever-larger subsidies for new reactors. Wishful thinking about energy generation has apparently induced both temporary blindness and long-term amnesia about the history of nuclear "mishaps."
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Tuesday, January 11, 2011 - 2:37pm
A Lousy New Year for Workers
"What's good for General Motors is good for the country," Defense Secretary nominee--and former GM CEO--Charles Wilson famously told the Senate Armed Services Committee in 1953. These weren't his exact words, but they have resonated nonetheless. Behind Wilson's apparent gaffe was an undeniable truth. GM did create millions of jobs, not only in the direct manufacture, shipping, and sale of automobiles, but in its peripheral stimulus for rubber, glass, and all the other components required to make a car.
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Saturday, June 26, 2010 - 10:17am
Remember Vietistan?
The McChrystal debacle dramatizes how military thinking dominates U.S. policy — look at how much of the budget the Pentagon commands — as well as the utter hopelessness of achieving anything but draining defeat from the U.S. occupation of Afghanistan. This lesson should have been learned after Vietnam. As Yogi Berra said, it's "déjà vu all over again."
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Friday, April 23, 2010 - 9:23am
Housing Is a Human Right
Our nation is running a $1.4 trillion-dollar budget deficit this year. So why is Congress on track to approve more than $1 trillion for "defense" spending, while cutting back services that most countries think of as human rights? Even in the wake of Obama's landmark health-care legislation, our priorities are out of sync with what the public needs. Consider this: About 3.5 million Americans--including 1.35 million children--are homeless for significant periods of time over the course of a year, according to the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty.
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Wednesday, October 28, 2009 - 11:15am
Cuban Embargo: Nothing Succeeds Like Failure
Once again, Cuba has asked the United Nations to help end the U.S. economic, financial and trade embargo. Havana says this blockade cost it more than $242 million last year. The embargo also stymies Cuban access to foreign capital from other nations, because investors face possible U.S. sanctions for doing business with Cuba.
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