Rick Salutin

Rick Salutin is a Canadian novelist, playwright, journalist, and critic and has been writing for more than forty years. Until October 1, 2010, he wrote a regular column in the Globe and Mail; on February 11, 2011, he began a weekly column in the Toronto Star.

Articles by this author

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Friday, November 28, 2014 - 10:00am
Rioting Elites and a Nation Built on the Rule of Lawlessness
Barack Obama looked at his most clueless, responding to the riots and rage in Ferguson, Missouri. He hasn't seemed so callow since the BP oil spill. Like he just wished it was over and could get on to the delights of his post-presidency. Or back to immigration reform and stalling that damn pipeline...
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Sunday, July 29, 2012 - 10:37am
Cockburn and Hitchens: Death Among the Columns
I’ve spent recent days on an island north of Huntsville pondering the death from cancer, at 71, of the Irish-American left-wing journalist Alexander Cockburn. He’s often paired with Christopher Hitchens , whose death last December got far more media attention, surely because Hitchens made a well-trod journey to the right in the final phase of his career. Cockburn never did.
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Friday, December 23, 2011 - 8:44am
The Bible and Ethical Economics
I’d like to join the war against the war against Christmas: a cause bravely championed by muffled voices in the catacombs like Bill O’Reilly at Fox News and Rex Murphy on CBC.
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Friday, November 25, 2011 - 10:13am
Non-Violence is Back and Shaking Things Up
This is a time of rejuvenation for non-violence. The Occupy movements were built on what one writer called “the courage of young people to fly into conflict on Gandhi’s wings.” The Arab Spring won its tenuous victories non-violently.
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Friday, November 18, 2011 - 9:35am
Should the Occupiers Stay or Go?
The Occupy movements have largely become dramas revolving around the excellent question posed by The Clash: Should I stay or should I go? It’s become a story about a place. Some, like London (Ontario) are gone. Others, like London (England) are on notice. Occupy Wall St. is gone but it’s back, in a different form. We’ll know about Occupy Toronto, apparently, tomorrow. But it’s possible that this is the wrong question.
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Friday, June 3, 2011 - 11:27am
The Strange, and Very Political, Death of Hope
Hope is indispensable in public and private life. I don’t mean brainless optimism in the face of facts. I mean hope that finds a way to persist in honest awareness of how bad things are.
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Saturday, April 17, 2010 - 10:53am
Afghanistan: Who Are the Heroes Here?
I mean we can sort of quasi-invade it but we can't walk into one of their prisons. I mean, give me a break." (Former Canadian embassy in Kabul official Eileen Olexiuk, on being told by superiors that she couldn't investigate prisoner transfers despite serious concerns over torture.)
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Sunday, October 12, 2008 - 12:06pm
Blowback from Afghanistan
In the U.S. "debates," it was the bleakest moment for me so far when Barack Obama said he lamented the war in Iraq because it "weakened our capacity to project power around the world." Not because it was wrong to invade and occupy a distant country, or even because it was a failed war. But because it hampered U.S. ability to invade and occupy other places. In this, he agrees with John McCain, who says the United States has a "sacred duty to suffer hardship and risk danger to protect the values of our civilization and impart them to humanity" by military might.
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Friday, September 14, 2007 - 3:12pm
A Little Nordic Sanity: Actually Doing What You Say
I squandered a chunk of my life this week watching U.S. congressional hearings on "progress" in Iraq, and media follow-ups. In case you didn't waste your own time, let me share some of my loss. There are supposedly two sides, for and against the war. Yet they sound the same. California Democrat Tom Lantos, who's against the war, started the hearings by saying "our" strategy is building national institutions and seeking "a political settlement."
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