Peter Bosshard

Peter Bosshard is the Interim Executive Director of International Rivers. He tweets at @PeterBosshard.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, June 7, 2016 - 2:30pm
A Renewable Revolution Challenges Destructive Energy Paradigm
Wind and solar power are on an exciting ride. Last year, new renewables for the first time made up more than half of the power capacity that was added around the world. New wind and solar plants, in other words, outstripped all new fossil fuel, hydropower and nuclear power plants. “Renewables are...
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Friday, December 4, 2015 - 10:15am
Ten Reasons Why Large Hydropower Is a False Solution to Climate Change
Large hydropower projects are often propagated as a “clean and green” source of electricity by international financial institutions, national governments and other actors. They greatly benefit from instruments meant to address climate change, including carbon credits under the Clean Development...
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Saturday, October 31, 2015 - 8:30am
Attack of the Zombie Dams (This Is Very Scary)
zom·bie dam /ˈzämbē dam/ noun 1. A proposed dam project that activists successfully halt before it's built, only to see it rise again and again – years later – in different forms. We’ve all seen classic zombie movies like “Night of the Living Dead.” If you haven’t, here’s a summary: A member of the...
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Thursday, July 16, 2015 - 3:00pm
30 Things You Didn’t Know About Rivers
1. Rivers are some of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet. Rivers and lakes sustain more fish species than the sea even though they contain 600 times less water. 2. Rivers feed us. Freshwater fisheries currently sustain up to 550 million people on a fish-based diet. 3. Rivers are the cradles...
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Friday, June 19, 2015 - 6:30am
For Renewables, Wind and Solar Could Soon Blow Big Dams Out of the Water
Dam builders like to claim that hydropower is the world’s largest source of renewable electricity. After a century-long head start over wind and solar power, large hydropower indeed accounted for 52% of the world’s renewable energy capacity in 2014. But new figures from the International Renewable...
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Saturday, March 14, 2015 - 8:45am
Why We Celebrate Rivers
The Chong people consider the Areng River at the foot of Cambodia’s Cardamom Mountains a sacred inheritance from their ancestors. The river sustains lush forests with rare elephant, tiger and crocodile species. The Chong people fish, grow rice, and gather roots and mushrooms on the river banks...
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Sunday, January 25, 2015 - 8:00am
Twelve Dams That Changed the World
Dams illustrate the brilliance and arrogance of human ingenuity. They generate one sixth of the world's electricity and irrigate one seventh of our food crops . They have flooded land areas the size of California, displaced a population the size of Germany’s, and turned freshwater into the...
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Tuesday, December 9, 2014 - 7:00am
The Hidden Hand Behind "Natural" Disasters
Floods and droughts in many parts of the world are getting ever more frequent and intense. Scientists have long warned that a changing climate is making such weather events more extreme. What is often neglected in the public debate is that the impacts of climate change on flood and drought...
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Tuesday, November 11, 2014 - 5:15pm
A Health Check-up for Our Environment—Ignored at Our Own Risk
In the 1950s, thousands of Baiji river dolphins plied the waters of the Yangtze, Asia’s mightiest river. The Chinese river dolphin had evolved over 20 millions of years, and was revered as the goddess of the Yangtze. By 1994, fewer than 100 individuals remained, and by 2006, the dolphin had become...
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Tuesday, September 23, 2014 - 8:15am
No Need to Sacrifice the Planet’s Arteries to Save Her Lungs
From the flood-prone coastline of Bangladesh to East Africa's drought-stricken farm lands, climate change hits people hardest who have least contributed to it. World governments have agreed to mobilize $100 billion a year for climate mitigation and adaptation projects by 2020, most directly through...
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