Frances Fox Piven

Frances Fox Piven

Frances Fox Piven is professor of political science and sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, where she has taught since 1982. Her latest book is Who’s Afraid of Frances Fox Piven? The Essential Writings of the Professor Glenn Beck Loves to Hate (The New Press). She is the author and co-author of numerous books, including The War at Home: The Domestic Costs of Bush's Militarism (2004) and Challenging Authority: How Ordinary People Change America (2006), and has received career and lifetime achievement awards from the American Sociological Association and the American Political Science Association. Frances has been featured on Democracy Now!, and regular contributor to The Nation

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, January 18, 2017
 Throw Sand in the Gears of Everything
A s many are saying, we woke from a nightmare to find it was our new reality. A gaggle of inflated far-right self-promoters and operatives, big businessmen and their toadies, and homegrown fascists will control the presidency and determine the Supreme Court majority, maybe for a generation or more...
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Wednesday, December 17, 2014
Howard Zinn and the Joy of a Political Life
Note from The Nation: The following is reprinted from Frances Fox Piven's introduction to Some Truths Are Not Self-Evident: Howard Zinn's Essays in The Nation on Civil Rights, Vietnam and the "War on Terror." Download yours today! The essays of Howard Zinn collected here remind me sharply of the...
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Friday, February 01, 2013
Movements Making Noise
American political history is usually told as the story of what political elites say and do. The twists and turns, advances and setbacks, wars, disasters and recoveries, are said to be the work of the founders, or of the presidents, or of the courts, or of the influence of a handful of great people who somehow emerge from the mass.
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Friday, October 05, 2012
Movements Need Politicians—and Vice Versa
The familiar question of whether we work on electoral politics or on movement politics is fraught with emotion and argument about whether movement or electoral politics is more effective for the left. We think it is the wrong question.
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Monday, September 17, 2012
Occupy's Protest Is Not Over. It Has Barely Begun
A good many observers wonder, is Occupy over?
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Friday, March 16, 2012
Occupy! and Make Them Do It
The spring months are likely to see the expansion of the Occupy movement. Evicted from the little parks where they were encamped, the activists are joining housing occupations and other protests against predatory banks, student protests against rising tuition and debt, and labor strikes and protests against lockouts.
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Monday, November 07, 2011
The War Against the Poor and Occupy Wall Street
We’ve been at war for decades now -- not just in Afghanistan or Iraq, but right here at home. Domestically, it’s been a war against the poor, but if you hadn’t noticed, that’s not surprising.
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Friday, March 18, 2011
Debt, Austerity and How to Fight Back
The Nation Editor's note: On Tuesday, April 5, hundreds of schools and community groups will participate in a teach-in on debt, austerity and how people are fighting back. From 2–3:30 pm (EST) a national teach-in will be streamed live from New York City, followed by local teach-ins and strategy discussions around the country. Read the call to action by Frances Fox Piven and Cornel West, check out the organizing guide and join the movement by attending or hosting a teach-in near you.
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Monday, February 14, 2011
1966's: The Weight of the Poor: A Strategy to End Poverty
From the Monday, May 2, 1966 issue of The Nation
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Monday, February 14, 2011
Crazy Talk and American Politics: or, My Glenn Beck Story
Most academics probably paid little attention at the end of January when Glenn Beck explained to his listeners that the protests in Egypt would lead to the establishment of a Muslim caliphate that would engulf Europe while China would extend its domination to New Zealand and, curiously, the Netherlands would fall to Russia. But there is a sense in which we should have.
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