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omnicron

Travelers arrive from international flights, including from South Africa, at Newark Liberty International Airport on November 30, 2021 in Newark, New Jersey. The United States, and a growing list of other countries, has restricted flights from southern African countries due to the detection of the COVID-19 Omicron variant last week in South Africa. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Travel Bans Are Not the Answer to the Omicron Variant

Africa does not need a travel ban. It needs to be traveled to, with medicine and public health infrastructure. We need to vaccinate Africans, not ban them.

Jesse Jackson

 by Chicago Sun-Times

Omicron, the new COVID-19 variant, is now on the march. While southern Africa appears to be its epicenter, countries including Britain, Canada, Australia, Israel and others now report cases. Dr. Anthony Fauci calls it "inevitable" that it will come to, or is already in, the U.S. We know the variant is very contagious, but still unknown is how severe it is or how resistant to vaccines it will be.

We know about omicron because South African scientists detected it early and their government notified the world immediately. Sadly, instead of being rewarded, South Africa is now punished, with the U.S. leading countries in slapping travel restrictions on South Africa and other African countries without offering any economic assistance to make up for the losses imposed.

We know about omicron because South African scientists detected it early and their government notified the world immediately. Sadly, instead of being rewarded, South Africa is now punished, with the U.S. leading countries in slapping travel restrictions on South Africa.

These travel bans are popular politically, but ineffective medically. We saw that with the original COVID-19 outbreak. Former President Donald Trump restricted travel from China, but the ban did not apply to American citizens and was not paired with wide-scale testing at the border and throughout the country. The virus had already escaped China, and European travelers brought it to the U.S. The ban is a wall, but a wall cannot stop an airborne disease.

President Joe Biden's ban promises to be equally ineffective. It also isn't linked to aggressive testing and tracking. Omicron is already spreading in countries not under travel restrictions. This is, as one writer noted, pandemic theatrics, not public health.

Only about 10% of the population of Africa has been vaccinated. They do not need a travel ban. They need to be traveled to, with medicine and public health infrastructure. We need to vaccinate them, not ban them.

This mistreatment is both unjust and foolish. Poorer nations in Africa have the most health needs and yet have the least access to vaccines, testing and treatment.

We cannot ignore them. The modern globe is intricately connected and pandemics spread even before they are noticed sufficiently to spark public response. To counter a global pandemic, the entire globe must be mobilized. If countries are ignored or left out, they can become incubators of new variants that sweep the world. The threat is global; the response must be global.

Yet, as the international director of the World Health Organization noted in February, 2.5 billion people in the world's 130 poor countries have not been vaccinated. The 85 poorest countries won't see mass vaccination until 2023. As he noted, "the humanitarian cost is unforgivable—and self-defeating, as each infected person is a potential source of new strains."

Repeated promises that vaccines would be made available have been broken. Neither the vaccines nor the resources to deliver them have been provided. Drug companies, reaping massive profits from vaccines largely developed with public funds, have fought to retain their monopolies and resist efforts to make vaccine production available across the world.

South Africa suffered this treatment before in relation to the treatment of AIDS. The drug companies, protected by rich nations, refused to let less expensive generic versions be manufactured and distributed. They even sued the Nelson Mandela government when it acted to allow importation of generics. Only overwhelming global outrage forced the drug companies to shelve the suit and cut a deal.

This week, more than 2 million nurses from 28 countries called on the United Nations to investigate rich countries—naming the European Union, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Singapore and Norway—who have blocked the waiver of patents for coronavirus vaccines. Sensibly, Joe Biden aligned the U.S. on the side of the waiver.

Decrying the failure of drug companies and governments to ensure that "critical treatments and vaccines are distributed equitably," the nurses' statement notes that this is not only unjust, but dangerous." A meeting of the World Trade Organization's Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights Council was postponed because of the continued division over making vaccines widely available.

No one is safe until everyone is safe. African lives are as precious as the lives of those who live in wealthy countries. In the modern world, borders can't be sealed and walls won't stop the spread of pandemics. As Dr. Martin Luther King taught us, "Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly."

We need to rethink our real security priorities. Instead of squandering hundreds of billions on a new arms race with China, we should be joining China and the rich nations of the world to build the public health capacities needed across the world, while mobilizing to make vaccines, treatments, masks and other protections universally available. Instead of letting drug companies ration drugs by price, we should be enlisting them—as we did private companies in World War II—to share vaccines and build production capacity.

We don't know yet how much of a threat Omicron poses. We do know that the COVID-19 pandemic isn't over; that death is still on the march, and that new variants will germinate in areas where people are not protected. Instead of banning travel from Africa, President Biden should be shining the light on Africa and leading the effort to reach out.


© 2021 Chicago Sun-Times
Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson

Jesse Jackson is an African-American civil rights activist and Baptist minister. He was a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1984 and 1988 and served as shadow senator for the District of Columbia from 1991 to 1997. He was the founder of both entities that merged to form Rainbow/PUSH.

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