Published on
by

The Rise of the Entitled Millennial Politician

"Now, there is absolutely nothing wrong with young people running for office... But simply being young does not mean one has access to the fountain of all wisdom. One must also have good political views."

Joe Kennedy III speaks during a Remembrance and Celebration of the Life & Enduring Legacy of Robert F. Kennedy event at Arlington National Cemetery on June 6, 2018 in Arlington, Virginia. (Photo: Leigh Vogel/Getty Images for RFK Human Rights )

Millennials are getting old. Our bones are starting to creak, we get more random aches and pains, we get hangovers infuriatingly easily, and going to bed early increasingly sounds like a wonderful Friday night plan.

On the other hand, we are also reaching the age of power and influence. And so the world is getting a taste of the most obnoxious type of millennial personality: the ambitious apple-polisher. Witness the rise of Pete Buttigieg and Joe Kennedy, two perfect examples of the type — men who think it all should just be handed to them.

Now, there is absolutely nothing wrong with young people running for office. More of us should be doing it, all across the country. But simply being young does not mean one has access to the fountain of all wisdom. One must also have good political views. In part because millennials have gotten the worst of American capitalism ground into our faces like a handful of broken glass over the past decade, we are by most measures the most left-wing generation in American history — save the Zoomers who are coming up behind us.

SCROLL TO CONTINUE WITH CONTENT

Never Miss a Beat.

Get our best delivered to your inbox.

But we're not all like that. There are racist conservative millennials, and there are moderate Third Way millennials, and there are millennials who seem to care about little but power and their careers. As Current Affairs' Nathan Robinson writes, Mayor Pete's own book suggests he is one of the latter type. He's a guy who went from Harvard straight to McKinsey, "the world's most sinister and amoral management consulting company." He expressed no serious qualms about that experience in his book, nor much interest in the plight of the poor black residents of South Bend, Indiana where he was subsequently elected mayor.

Read the full article at The Week.

Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper is a national correspondent at TheWeek.com. His work has appeared in the Washington Monthly, The New Republic, and the Washington Post.

Our pandemic coverage is free to all. As is all of our reporting.

No paywalls. No advertising. No corporate sponsors. Since the coronavirus pandemic broke out, traffic to the Common Dreams website has gone through the roof— at times overwhelming and crashing our servers. Common Dreams is a news outlet for everyone and that’s why we have never made our readers pay for the news and never will. But if you can, please support our essential reporting today. Without Your Support We Won't Exist.

Please select a donation method:



Share This Article