Published on
by

The Impossibility of Bipartisan Healthcare Compromise

Democrats should write a health-care reform bill so aggressive that it drastically weakens the profitability of Big Medical, and drives many of them out of business entirely. If you cannot join them, beat them

The human carnage inflicted by this bloody quagmire of corruption and waste is nigh unimaginable. (Photo: Screenshot)

The human carnage inflicted by this bloody quagmire of corruption and waste is nigh unimaginable. (Photo: Screenshot)

If there's one thing political centrists claim to value, it's compromise. It's "the way Washington is supposed to work," writes Third Way's Bill Schneider. "Centrists, or moderates, are really people who are willing to compromise," The Moderate Voice's Robert Levine tells Vice.

What does this mean when it comes to health care and the developing lefty push for Medicare-for-all? The fresh new centrist health-care organization, the Partnership for America's Health Care Future (PAHCF), says it is a "diverse, patient-focused coalition committed to pragmatic solutions to strengthen our nation's health-care system." In keeping with the moderate #brand, PAHCF may not support Medicare-for-all. But perhaps they might support a quarter-measure compromise, like allowing people under 65 to buy into Medicare?

"Moderation" is routinely a cynical veneer over raw privilege and self-interest.

Haha, of course not. Their offer is this: nothing.

However, "moderation" is routinely not even that, but instead a cynical veneer over raw privilege and self-interest. The American health-care system, as I have written on many occasions, is a titanic maelstrom of waste, fraud, and outright predation — ripping off the American people to the tune of $1 trillion annually.

And so, Adam Cancryn reports on the centrist Democrats plotting with Big Medical to strangle the Medicare-for-all effort:

Deep-pocketed hospital, insurance, and other lobbies are plotting to crush progressives' hopes of expanding the government's role in health care once they take control of the House. The private-sector interests, backed in some cases by key Obama administration and Hillary Clinton campaign alumni, are now focused on beating back another prospective health-care overhaul, including plans that would allow people under 65 to buy into Medicare. [Politico]

Read the full article here.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do.

Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper is a national correspondent at TheWeek.com. His work has appeared in the Washington Monthly, The New Republic, and the Washington Post.

Share This Article