Constitution Project

The Constitution Project is a politically independent think tank established in 1997 to promote and defend constitutional safeguards. More information about the Constitution Project is available at http://constitutionproject.org/.

Releases by this organization

Newswire article
Wednesday, September 23, 2009
Constitution Project Applauds First Steps in New State Secrets Policy
Attorney General Eric Holder announced today a new policy tightening the standards for when executive agencies may assert the state secrets privilege to prevent disclosure of national security secrets in litigation. The announcement marks a shift in policy away from the broad assertions of secrecy previously made by both the Bush and Obama administrations in such cases.
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Newswire article
Wednesday, September 23, 2009
Senate Judiciary Committee Addresses Patriot Act Reform
The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing today to address the need for reform to the USA PATRIOT Act, which has three provisions that will sunset at the end of the year unless reauthorized by Congress. Yesterday, Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, along with Senators Benjamin Cardin and Ted Kaufman introduced the USA Patriot Act Sunset Extension Act to reauthorize these expiring provisions, while incorporating important civil liberties safeguards.
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Newswire article
Tuesday, September 22, 2009
Constitution Project Releases Statement on Reforming the Patriot Act
As the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties meets today for a hearing on the USA PATRIOT Act, the Constitution Project's Liberty and Security Committee releases its Statement on Reforming the Patriot Act. Thomas B.
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Newswire article
Wednesday, September 16, 2009
Charles Hood Appeal Dismissed by Texas Criminal Court
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals dismissed the habeas application of Charles Dean Hood today, ignoring evidence that his right to a constitutionally fair trial was inherently violated because of the romantic relationship between his prosecutor and the judge presiding over his trial.
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Newswire article
Monday, August 24, 2009
Interrogation Reports Further Demonstrate the Need for Comprehensive Nonpartisan Commission of Inquiry
The Obama administration today made public more portions of the 2004 CIA Inspector General report that examined the agency's interrogation program used for suspected terrorists in the aftermath of the attacks on September 11, 2001. The newly-released information provides additional details on the now widely-discredited legal rationale used to justify harsh interrogation tactics - tactics that have since been prohibited by President Obama.
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Newswire article
Tuesday, July 28, 2009
Congress Continues to Debate Military Commissions
The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security has scheduled a hearing for this afternoon to examine the options available to prosecute suspected terrorists - those currently held at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and elsewhere, as well as for future detainees. The Constitution Project welcomes further hearings to discuss the merits of various avenues to try detainees, but warns against seeking to reform the flawed and tainted military commissions adopted under the Military Commissions Act of 2006.
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Newswire article
Thursday, July 16, 2009
Constitution Project Releases Recommendations on Improved Information Sharing and Increased Government Transparency
The Constitution Project released a report today that highlights the problems with current government policies for identifying and handling classified and sensitive information. "Reining in Excessive Secrecy: Recommendations for Reform of the Classification and Controlled Unclassified Information Systems," offers specific policy reforms that would improve government transparency, as well as ensure protection of both our national security and core constitutional principles.
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Newswire article
Thursday, July 16, 2009
Restarting Flawed Military Commissions Will Endanger National Security
The House Armed Services Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing this afternoon to examine the legal implications of reforming the military commission system for trials of suspected terrorists. In May, President Obama announced his plan to revive the military commissions for a number of detainees currently being held at Guantanamo Bay. Although the Constitution Project welcomes Congress' efforts to evaluate this crucial policy matter carefully, the Project urges Congress to ultimately reject this dangerous proposal.
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Newswire article
Tuesday, July 14, 2009
Mandatory Minimums Fail to Achieve Justice
The House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security has scheduled a hearing today to examine mandatory minimum sentencing. The Subcommittee will consider three different proposed pieces of legislation that seek to provide judges with more discretion to avoid unjust outcomes when handing down sentences. The Constitution Project applauds the Subcommittee for today's hearing and for moving forward with these much-needed fixes to our nation's sentencing policies.
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Newswire article
Tuesday, July 07, 2009
Constitution Project Warns Against Revival of Failed Military Commissions
The Senate Armed Services Committee is scheduled to hold a hearing this morning to examine the legal issues surrounding military commissions and trials of suspected terrorists already in United States custody. In May, President Obama announced his intention to revive the military commissions for a select group of detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay. Although the Constitution Project welcomes Congress' efforts to evaluate this crucial policy matter carefully, the Project urges members of Congress to ultimately reject this fundamentally flawed proposal.
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