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Supporters of President Donald Trump rampage through the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.

Supporters of President Donald Trump rampage through the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. (Photo: Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images)

No, Not 'Totally Appropriate': Poll Shows 63% in US Believe Trump Incited Deadly Insurrection

"Trump's speech last week openly incited insurrectionists to storm the Capitol. Today, he called those comments 'totally appropriate.' He is continuing to encourage insurrection and undermining the rule of law."

Jake Johnson

Shortly after President Donald Trump on Tuesday characteristically refused to accept any responsibility for inciting the mob of his supporters that attacked the U.S. Capitol last week, new polling showed that nearly two-thirds of likely U.S. voters believe the lame-duck incumbent is directly to blame for the deadly violence.

According to a new national survey (pdf) conducted by Vox and Data for Progress, 63% of likely voters—including 81% of Democrats, 67% of Independents, and just 32% of Republicans—believe Trump is either "very much" or "somewhat" to blame for the right-wing invasion of the Capitol Building, which led to the deaths of five people.

A majority of likely U.S. voters believe Republican lawmakers—specifically Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Texas.) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.)—share some of the blame for inciting the mob attack on Congress as lawmakers moved to certify President-elect Joe Biden's decisive Electoral College victory.

Speaking to the press Tuesday during his first in-person public appearance since last Wednesday's attack, Trump expressed no regret for the unhinged speech he delivered just before his supporters invaded the halls of Congress and claimed that "people thought what I said was totally appropriate." The president didn't specify who thought his speech, which was packed with deranged lies about the election, was perfectly acceptable.

Trump's comments to reporters Tuesday came as the president is facing a likely second impeachment on at least one charge of inciting insurrection against the U.S. government. The House is expected to hold an impeachment vote as early as Wednesday.

The Vox-Data for Progress poll released Tuesday found that 51% of likely U.S. voters believe Trump should be "impeached for his role in attempting to overturn the result of the 2020 presidential election and inciting riots that led to the storming of the Capitol Building."

Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) tweeted Tuesday that "Trump's speech last week openly incited insurrectionists to storm the Capitol."

"Today, he called those comments 'totally appropriate.' He is continuing to encourage insurrection and undermining the rule of law," Merkley added. "He must be held to account for attacking our Constitution and our country."


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