Published on
by

As Zuckerberg Refuses to Testify, UK Seizes Thousands of 'Potentially Explosive' Documents Facebook Has Tried to Keep Secret

"Facebook will learn that all are subject to the rule of law. Yes, even them."

Mark Zuckerberg

 Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the keynote address at Facebook's F8 Developer Conference on April 18, 2017 at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California. (Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

After Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg refused to testify at a joint hearing with lawmakers from seven nations over his company's invasive privacy practices, the U.K. Parliament on Saturday legally seized thousands of secret and "potentially explosive" Facebook documents in what was described as an extraordinary move to uncover information about the company's role in the Cambridge Analytica data-mining scandal.

"This week Facebook is going to learn the hard way that it is not above the law."
—Christopher Wylie, whistleblower

According to the Guardian, the documents were initially obtained during a legal discovery process by the now-defunct U.S. software company Six4Three, which is currently suing Facebook.

Conservative MP Damian Collins, the Guardian reports, then "invoked a rare parliamentary mechanism" that compelled Six4Three's founder—who was on a business trip in London—to hand over the documents, which reportedly "contain significant revelations about Facebook decisions on data and privacy controls that led to the Cambridge Analytica scandal. It is claimed they include confidential emails between senior executives, and correspondence with Zuckerberg."

"This week Facebook is going to learn the hard way that it is not above the law. In ignoring the inquiries of seven national parliaments, Mark Zuckerberg brought this escalation upon himself, as there was no other way to get this critical information," wrote Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who was previously the director of research at Cambridge Analytica.

"The irony is... Mark Zuckerberg must be pretty pissed that his data was seized without him knowing," Wylie added.

The U.K. Parliament's seizure of documents Facebook has long worked to keep hidden from the public view comes as the social media behemoth is embroiled in yet another scandal, this time over its use of a right-wing public relations firm to spread anti-Semitic conspiracy theories about its critics.

"Facebook will learn that all are subject to the rule of law," Labour MP Ian Lucas wrote on Twitter. "Yes, even them."

We want a more open and sharing world.

That's why our content is free. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported.

All of our original content is published under Creative Commons—allowing (and encouraging) our articles to be republished freely anywhere. In addition to the traffic and reach our content generates on our site, the multiplying impact of our work is huge and growing as our articles flourish across the Internet and are republished by other large and small online and print outlets around the world.

Several times a year we run brief campaigns to ask our readers to pitch in—and thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Our 2019 Mid-Year Campaign is underway. Can you help? We can't do it without you.

Please select a donation method:



Share This Article