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Common Dreams

US Sailors: Response to Fukushima Emergency Resulted in Cancer

Dozens of crew members have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer, testicular cancer and leukemia

by
Common Dreams staff

US Navy personnel aboard the USS Reagan assist with Fukushima disaster relief. (Photo: Seaman Nicholas A. Groesch/U.S. Navy via Getty Images)

U.S. sailors who were part of the emergency response effort in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami that led to the Fukushima nuclear meltdown in 2011 are now reporting numerous forms of cancers they say are a direct result of being exposed to radiation fallout from the disaster.

As this Al-Jazeera blog post reports:

Fifty-one crew members of the USS Ronald Reagan say they are suffering from a variety of cancers as a direct result of their involvement in Operation Tomodachi, a U.S. rescue mission in Fukushima after the nuclear disaster in March 2011. The affected sailors are suing Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), alleging that the utility mishandled the crisis and did not adequately warn the crew of the risk of participating in the earthquake relief efforts.

Crew members, many of whom are in their 20s, have been diagnosed with conditions including thyroid cancer, testicular cancer and leukemia. The Department of Defense says the Navy took "proactive measures" in order to "mitigate the levels of Fukushima-related contamination on U.S. Navy ships and aircraft” and that crew members were not exposed to dangerous radiation levels.

Charles Bonner, attorney for the sailors, says the radiation the USS Ronald Reagan crew was exposed to extended beyond the tasks of Operation Tomodachi. Deployed ships desalinate their own water, so crew members were unknowingly drinking, cooking with, and bathing in contaminated water due to the ship's close proximity to the disaster site, according to Bonner. The USS Reagan was ultimately informed of the contamination after a month of living approximately 10 miles offshore from the affected region.

The number of plaintiffs in the case could grow significantly as 150 additional crew members are currently being medically screened to join. The sailors are seeking $40 million each in punitive damages as well as a $1 billion fund for future medical expenses for members of the USS Reagan.

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