Tom Athanasiou

Tom Athanasiou directs EcoEquity, an Earth Island Institute-sponsored project, and is a member of the Greenhouse Development Rights authors’ group.  His books include, Slow Reckoning: The Ecology of a Divided Planet and Dead Heat: Global Justice and Global Warming.

Articles by this author

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Monday, November 16, 2015
Paris: The End of the Beginning
As I write this, the United Nations climate conference is only weeks away. And now, of course, it will take place in an atmosphere of mourning, and crisis, and war. Beyond this change of tone, what difference will the 11/13 attacks make on the outcome of the negotiations? It is impossible to say,...
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Tuesday, November 18, 2014
No Time To Spare: Capitalism and Justice in the Age of Climate Change
The first thing to say about Naomi’s Klein’s latest book is that its title makes a grand promise, This Changes Everything – and that’s before you even get to the subtitle, which sets up a face-off between capitalism on one side and the climate on the other. The second thing to say is that no single...
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Thursday, May 05, 2011
Tax Justice as Climate Justice
You don’t have to leave America to go to the Third World.
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Tuesday, November 30, 2010
The Cancun Setup
The first thing to say about the climate negotiations - meeting soon in sunny Mexico - is that they're teetering at the edge of what, back in the day, we used to call a "legitimation crisis." On every side, folks are eager to suggest the negotiations have become a waste of time. It's gotten to the point where people are apologizing for going to Cancun, as if it were bad for their image to be seen at the climate talks.
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Thursday, March 04, 2010
After Copenhagen: How Can We Move Forward?
First, a confession: This is not another enumeration of confident judgments. I will not tell you that Copenhagen was an unmitigated failure. Or that this failure was Obama's fault. Or that, as is the new fashion, China was the ugliest of them all. I will not say that the South's negotiators made impossible demands. Or argue that the United Nations' process is unwieldy and obsolete. I will not claim that only domestic US action really matters.
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