Thomas S. Harrington

Thomas S. Harrington

Thomas S. Harrington is professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and the author of Public Intellectuals and Nation Building in the Iberian Peninsula, 1900–1925: The Alchemy of Identity (Bucknell University Press, 2014).

Articles by this author

Views
Saturday, October 08, 2011
Preemptive Strikes of the (Pseudo) Progressive Kind
For reasons related mostly to geography and the positive experiences of an uncle and a number of family friends, I attended an undergraduate college run by the Society of Jesus, a Catholic religious order known more colloquially as “the Jesuits”.
Read more
Views
Sunday, September 25, 2011
Junk Food for the Mind
A small but growing number of Americans have finally realized that much of what the agro-business industry sells them at large food stores is not only not nutritious but, in many cases, a threat to their health. Hence, they have begun to seek out new sources of nutrition. How long will it take for these same health-conscious Americans to realize that the agro-business assault on their bodies has a very clear correlate in the information diet offered up by the mainstream media in this country?
Read more
Views
Tuesday, August 30, 2011
The Doctrine of “Reasonable Doubt”: Universal Principle or Perk of the Powerful?
In Sunday’s New York Times, novelist and lawyer Scott Turow does what all too few commentators on public affairs are willing or--perhaps more accurately and sadly--able to do these days. He looks at a story in the news and seeks to articulate what, if any, important principles are at play beyond the matter’s perceived effect on the immediate fortunes of an individual or a corporate entity.
Read more
Views
Monday, August 22, 2011
Learned Helplessness and the Imperial Mind
As some of you have perhaps noticed, I am fascinated by the Baroque, and, more specifically, with how so much of the cultural production in today's America resembles the fruits of that movement which dominated the Spanish empire in the period after the Council of Trent (1543 to 1563), which is to say, the series of strategic conclaves that gave birth to the Counterreformation.
Read more
Views
Tuesday, August 16, 2011
Ballots and Democracy: Big Media Is Just Not That Into It
Last Saturday, we witnessed what has been regularly touted as one of the first big events of the 2012 campaign for the White House: the Iowa Straw Poll. The results of the poll were the following: Michele Bachmann (4823, 28.55%) Ron Paul (4671, 27.65%), Tim Pawlenty (2293, 13.57%), Rick Santorum (1657, 9.81%) Herman Cain (1456, 8.62%) Rick Perry (718, 3.62%) Mitt Romney (567, 3.36%) Newt Gingrich (385, 2.28%) Jon Huntsmann (69, 0.41%) Thad McCotter (35, 0.21%).
Read more
Views
Monday, August 15, 2011
Tribalism Is Dead, Long Live the Tribe
A month or so back, Americans gathered together with friends and family to celebrate the Fourth of July. Had an anthropologist from another planet been on hand to observe the event, she would have no doubt quickly concluded that we were celebrating either a great military victory or an historic breakthrough in the monetization of commerce. If she were a particularly skilled and persistent social observer with some ability to access our language, she might conclude that the holiday also had something to do with “freedom”.
Read more
Views
Thursday, August 11, 2011
The Partisanship Canard
This morning I tuned into the Diane Rehm Show on NPR (I know, but some bad old habits take time to break!) while doing a couple of errands in the car. The truth be told, however, I could have been accessing any of a number of outlets in our mainstream media landscape. How do I know this? Because Rehm’s panel of Washington insiders (James Fallows, Norman Ornstein, Gretchen Morgensen and Stuart Rothenberg) was pretty much in agreement on the fact that “excessive partisanship” was a key factor in causing the recent debt debacle.
Read more
Views
Sunday, August 07, 2011
When 'Everybody Has a Price' Who Will Stand Up to Injustice?
“Seems that everybody’s got a price, I wonder how they sleep at night”. With this line from her catchy tune, “Price Tag”, the precocious British pop singer Jessie J. touches on a cultural issue that very few of the elite opinion-makers in this country seldom ever dare to address frontally.
Read more
Views
Friday, July 22, 2011
On Bumper Stickers That Say 'Coexist'
I suspect you’ve seen them somewhere in your daily travels, especially if you live in, or near, a known bastion of liberal thought. I am referring to those blue bumper stickers with the word “COEXIST” spelled out in letters cleverly derived from the peace sign, the male and female gender signs, and most prominently, the symbols of the world’s major spiritual traditions.
Read more
Views
Sunday, June 26, 2011
Quick! Look Over There!
Like many children of my generation, I ate school lunches from plastic trays lined up tightly against each other on folding tables in the school gym. As we ate, teachers milled about. Their job was to keep an eye out for any sign of raucous or anti-social behavior. As we got older, enterprising classmates learned to exploit the situation for their own ends.
Read more

Pages