Robert Jensen

Robert Jensen

Robert Jensen, an emeritus professor in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin, collaborates with Ecosphere Studies at The Land Institute. He is the author of several books, including The End of Patriarchy: Radical Feminism for Men and  Plain Radical: Living, Loving, and Learning to Leave the Planet Gracefully. He can be reached at rjensen@austin.utexas.edu or through his website.

Articles by this author

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Saturday, July 27, 2013
Peace Talks: A New Chapter in An Old Book
New negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians may begin next week, with much talk of a “new chapter” in the seemingly intractable conflict. A new chapter, perhaps, but who is writing the book?
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Monday, June 24, 2013
Terror v. Surveillance? Keeping Americans Safe in Two Simple Steps
In the frenzy over Edward Snowden’s leak of classified information about government data-mining surveillance, public officials and pundits have tried to lock us into a narrowly defined and diversionary discussion that ignores the most important question we face about terrorism. Their argument goes something like this: No one wants to die in a terrorist attack. This kind of spying is necessary to prevent terrorist attacks. So, stop whining about how information is being collected, used, and potentially misused—it’s better than dying.
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Sunday, May 26, 2013
Get Apocalyptic: Why Radical is the New Normal
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Friday, January 18, 2013
Torture Is Trivial
The great American torture debate has been rekindled by the nationwide release of “Zero Dark Thirty,” the hot new movie about the CIA’s hunt for Osama bin Laden.
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Tuesday, July 10, 2012
Hope is for the Lazy: The Challenge of Our Dead World
The following is an edited version of a sermon delivered July 8, 2012, at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Austin, TX: In 2005, I preached on the ecological crisis in a sermon I titled “ Hope is for the Weak: The Challenge of a Broken World .” Looking back, I realize that I had been far too upbeat and optimistic, probably trying too hard to be liked. Today I want to correct that.
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Friday, May 18, 2012
The Case for a Morality of Radical Caution
Though my politics are radical, my approach to vexing moral questions is cautious; I try to be aware not only of my limits but of human limits to understand ourselves in a complex world. That’s why I call myself a radically cautious vegetarian. Here’s how it worked out:
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Friday, March 23, 2012
Journalists Rock! Journalism Sucks!
At an antiwar conference with predominantly left/progressive activists, I began a talk on the failures of contemporary news media by asking how the group felt about teachers. There was a resounding cheer and calls to support teachers. Then I asked how they felt about journalists— and the reaction was mixed. Some people booed, others laughed, and one person shouted out, “I like real journalists!”
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Friday, March 09, 2012
Holding onto the Joy in Teaching
I am a tenured professor in a relatively stable university, which is quite possibly the best job in the world. I get paid well to read, think, talk, and write, and I have more job security than almost anyone I know. Like many professors, I am critical of the increasingly corporate nature of universities. The conservative/neoliberal project of turning public schools into educational factories is also gathering steam in higher education, and there is much organizing work necessary just to protect what little space for critical thinking still exists.
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Monday, January 23, 2012
Conservative Fantasies About the Miracles of the Market
A central doctrine of evangelicals for the “free market” is its capacity for innovation: New ideas, new technologies, new gadgets -- all flow not from governments but from individuals and businesses allowed to flourish in the market, we are told.
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Monday, November 28, 2011
Occupy Congress: Norman Solomon Sees a Role for Progressive Legislators
Conventional politics in the United States focuses on elections, while left activists typically argue that political change comes not from electing better politicians but building movements strong enough to force politicians to accept progressive change. Norman Solomon has concluded it isn’t either/or. A prominent writer and leader in left movements for decades, Solomon is running for Congress in the hopes of being practical and remaining principled.
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