Phyllis Bennis

Phyllis Bennis

Phyllis Bennis is a fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies. Her most recent book is the 7th updated edition of Understanding the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: A Primer. Follow her on Twitter: @PhyllisBennis

Articles by this author

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Friday, September 16, 2011
All the Countries the US is at War with after 9/11
September 11 commemorations were everywhere this past weekend. My own view is that the devastating attacks of September 11 were, along with an enormous human tragedy, a huge crime, a crime against humanity. But they did not threaten our country’s existence, they did not threaten our democracy.
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Wednesday, September 07, 2011
Headlines or Not, the Iraq War is Not Over
It might seem like cause for celebration after reading the New York Times headline, " Iraq War Marks First Month with No U.S.
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Tuesday, August 23, 2011
Too Soon to Declare Victory
The origins of the Libyan transition emerged very much in the context of the Arab Spring – a popular uprising against a brutal dictatorship. But unlike others in the neighborhood – Egypt and Tunisia especially, but also Bahrain, and even Syria – Libyans quickly took up arms on a large scale to challenge the regime's assault. That initial decision soon led to calls for a Western no-fly zone, and quickly to the welcoming of direct US/NATO/Qatari military intervention based on the UN resolution's "all necessary measures" language.
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Saturday, July 16, 2011
Hollow Deficit Debate Ignores the Burden of Afghanistan Military Spending
At this moment the hollow debate on the deficit has sucked up almost all the oxygen in the Capitol. Yet the war in Afghanistan which costs us hundreds of billions of dollars a year is scarcely mentioned. Sixty-four percent of the people of this country believe that the war in Afghanistan is not worth fighting, so representing "the people" should mean using Congressional power to end that war — not least because the war budget is the biggest potential source of money to pay for jobs.
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Friday, July 15, 2011
Libya and the Limits to the "Responsibility to Protect"
The United Nations Charter begins with the commitment to ending the “scourge of war”. And just as the Charter serves as the core repository of international law, the United Nations (UN) itself should serve as the broadest and most representative institution of the international community as a whole. That should mean the UN playing the central role in ending wars and imposing ceasefires, in establishing the primacy of diplomacy and negotiating peace.
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Thursday, May 19, 2011
Before Obama's Speech, A Few Thoughts on a New Middle East Policy
The Obama administration faces a huge contradiction in trying to craft a new policy for the Middle East in the midst of the Arab Spring.
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Monday, May 02, 2011
Justice or Vengeance?
AMMAN, Jordan — U.S. agents killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan, apparently without cooperation from the government in Islamabad. The al-Qaeda leader was responsible for great suffering; I do not mourn his death. But every action has causes and consequences, and in the current moment all are dangerous.
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Monday, March 28, 2011
Attack on Libya May Unleash a Long War
The United States and its allies launched the war against Libya on the eighth anniversary of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. President Barack Obama says the U.S. will transfer command authority very soon, that military action should be over in "days, not weeks," and that he wants no boots on the ground. But the parallels with other U.S. wars in the Middle East don't bode well.
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Wednesday, March 23, 2011
Libya Intervention Threatens the Arab Spring
Western air and naval strikes against Libya are threatening the Arab Spring.
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Friday, February 11, 2011
Mubarak's Defiance
After deliberately raising the hopes of millions of Egyptians and millions more around the world, U.S.-backed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak defied the rising demand of the millions of protesters who have taken to Egypt's streets, to announce he will remain in office. Claiming he wouldn't bow to "foreign pressure," Mubarak, he said he had "laid down a vision...to exit the current crisis, and to realize the demands voiced by the youth and citizens...without violating the Constitution."
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