Huck Gutman

Huck Gutman, a professor at the University of Vermont, was formerly Chief of Staff to U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT).

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, October 09, 2002
America’s New Policy of Preemption, and the World Economy
A 31-page document, "The National Security Strategy for the United States", recently submitted by President George W Bush to the Congress, has received much attention. In that document, the Bush administration asserts that "to counter a sufficient threat to our national security to forestall or prevent such hostile acts by our adversaries, the United States will, if necessary, act pre-emptively".
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Sunday, July 14, 2002
Dishonesty, Greed and Hypocrisy in Corporate America
This is a tale of greed. And dishonesty. And hypocrisy. These are hard times for Wall Street, the American economy, and President George W. Bush. As the conservative and pro-business major publication Fortune reports, ongoing revelations of corporate wrongdoing and accounting scandals have "created a crisis of investor confidence the likes of which hasn't been seen since the Great Depression."
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Monday, July 01, 2002
Economic Inequality in US
Like those magicians whose hand is quicker than the eye, the acolytes of American capitalism make arguments that are fascinating - and deceptive. The historian Francis Fukuyama, darling of American bankers and industrialists and conservative politicians, famously proclaimed "the end of history". What he was referring to was the uncontested victory of capitalism as the now dominant motor force of societies all over the globe.
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Wednesday, June 05, 2002
A South Asian Colloquy
In recent days, a remarkable colloquy has taken place in the American media between two men widely regarded as the greatest contemporary Indian novelists. Amitav Ghosh, in America's most important progressive weekly magazine, The Nation, argued that a new imperialism is in the air: "The idea of empire...has recently undergone a strange rehabilitation in the United States."
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Tuesday, April 30, 2002
President Bush and the Middle East
In a world where some problems appear intractable, insoluble, ever-festering, perhaps no problem seems larger or more threatening to world security than that of the Middle East.
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Friday, March 22, 2002
Threats to Peace
A poem by the American poet Wallace Stevens begins, "After the final no there comes a yes/And on that yes the future world depends." If only the world leaders of our time would understand the principle of affirmation and ongoing-ness that Stevens evokes in those two lines. But, sadly, many do not. Mr. Bush, Mr. Sharon, Mr. Arafat, as well as Mr. Blair and Mr. Bin Laden, see the world from a particular narrow perspective, each closed to the possibility that there are alternative ways in which history can unfold.
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Saturday, February 16, 2002
Enron Scandal: The Long, Winding Trail
Who owns the government of the United States? The answer should be simple: the people do. After all, the root of 'democracy' is 'demos,' the Greek for common people. As America's greatest president, Abraham Lincoln, said on a momentous occasion, the nation had a government "of the people, by the people, for the people."
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Friday, February 15, 2002
Bush's Biggest Donors Had Links to Enron
Enron contributed $736,800 to George W. Bush over the past eight years, his single largest contributor. Many are looking for a smoking gun that will link Enron, directly, to specific favors. They want to see what specific decisions Enron bought. It is possible that such decisions will be uncovered, the evidence supplied.
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Thursday, February 07, 2002
The Lessons of the Enron Debacle
The fall of Enron, and its subsequent bankruptcy, may well be the largest scandal in the history of American business and politics. If we ask, "What went wrong with Enron?" the answer would be, "Everything."
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Tuesday, December 18, 2001
The Inhumanization of War
The United States has had two great war poets. Surprisingly, both wrote about a conflict now distant, the American Civil War of 1861-65, when the nation's northern and southern states opposed one another in a series of bloody battles.
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