Brian Wakamo

Brian Wakamo

Brian Wakamo is a researcher on the Global Economy Project at the Institute for Policy Studies.

Articles by this author

The social mission of USPS is more important than ever as our country faces a health and economic crisis that is tearing apart families and communities. (Photo: David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images) Views
Tuesday, July 21, 2020
USPS Needs Financial Aid to Continue Providing Essential Services
The U.S. Postal Service is playing a more vital role than ever in our country’s public health and economy during the Covid-19 pandemic. Postal workers have performed extraordinarily well in handling the skyrocketing demand for home deliveries of essentials, from medicine to food. This unprecedented...
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Cancellation of student debt would also boost the broader economy by creating a huge financial stimulus. (Photo: YouTube/screenshot) Views
Monday, June 15, 2020
Instead of Bailing Out For-Profit Colleges, Congress Should Cancel Student Debt
The more than 40 million Americans who’ve lost their jobs under the pandemic include many people who are saddled with college debt. And yet Congress has done nothing to reduce the $1.68 trillion in student debts. Meanwhile, for-profit colleges that have loaded up students with heavy debt burdens...
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USPS provides service at uniform and reasonable rates, delivering to 157 million addresses at least six days a week, no matter where they live. (Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Views
Friday, May 01, 2020
Postal Bankruptcy Would Hit Rural America Hardest
As postal workers strain to meet demand for deliveries of medicine, food, and other essentials, the U.S. Postal Service is facing potential financial collapse due to plummeting mail revenue. Without a major cash infusion, the USPS is on track to run out of money before the end of September,...
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The upcoming Super Tuesday primaries will include two states — Colorado and Utah — that have shifted completely to vote at home systems, as well as California, which has allowed counties to run all-mail elections for years and is transitioning into a fully vote at home system in the next few years. (Photo: Getty Images) Views
Thursday, February 27, 2020
To Reduce Inequality in the Election Process, All States Should Allow Voting At Home
In the United States of America, we have an election process in which the wealthiest Americans can spend unlimited funds to buy political influence while the poor, particularly poor people of color, face multiple barriers to exercising their most basic democratic right: voting. As a result, the...
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Saturday, December 14, 2019
Postal Pay Cuts Provoked a General Strike in Finland. US Postal Workers Deserve the Same Solidarity.
Finland now has the youngest prime minister in the world, 34-year-old Sanna Marin. The Social Democrat was catapulted into power when her predecessor, Antti Rinne, was forced to resign after a postal worker dispute escalated into a nationwide general strike. Rinne’s downfall was shockingly rapid...
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Rather than the story of a Postal Service facing dire financial straits, it is time we see the Postal Service for what it really is: a well-loved public institution that has risen to every challenge and innovated its way to new services even in the face of an unprecedented congressional mandate. (Photo: Ron Doke/Flickr/cc) Views
Monday, July 15, 2019
How Congress Manufactured a Postal Crisis—And How to Fix it
In 2006, Congress passed a law that imposed extraordinary costs on the U.S. Postal Service. The Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) required the USPS to create a $72 billion fund to pay for the cost of its post-retirement health care costs, 75 years into the future. This burden applies...
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A customer pays for a bag of cherry tomatoes with EBT tokens at a farmers market. Views
Sunday, July 07, 2019
We Have the Money to Fix Our Food System
Poverty is expensive, but fixing it doesn't have to be—at least not compared to the status quo.
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"In some places, annual interest rates for these lenders average over 500 percent." (Photo: John Donges ) Views
Friday, May 18, 2018
The Post Office as an Alternative to Shady Private Banks
Millions of Americans live in “banking deserts,” without adequate access to brick and mortar banks and the services they provide. Rural and poor communities, where local banks left town thanks to the recession or the big banks buying them out, are especially affected. Often it’s risky payday...
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