Thomas S. Harrington

Thomas S. Harrington is a professor of Iberian Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and the author of the recently published book, Livin' la Vida Barroca: American Culture in a Time of
Imperial Orthodoxies.

Articles by this author

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Friday, August 29, 2014 - 6:45am
Full Spectrum Dominance: US Policy From Iraq to Ukraine
Last Saturday, Angela Merkel went to Kiev to pledge increased financial and political support for the coup-installed regime's war against separatist forces in the eastern and largely Russian-speaking part of Ukraine. Seldom in recent history—and that is saying a lot—have we witnessed a more...
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Thursday, February 13, 2014 - 12:32pm
Hypocrisy in Sochi: On Slamming Russian Repression, But Rarely Our Own
Oh, what fun it is to mock Putin and his attempts to present a civilized and modern face to the world.
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Wednesday, December 25, 2013 - 2:17pm
Israel Has Been “Singled Out” in the US for a Very Long Time
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Friday, January 4, 2013 - 12:23pm
How Liberals Shirk Responsibility for Atrocious Policies
When a person votes for George W. Bush or another Republican, it is generally presumed that he or she is expressing support for the candidate’s policy prescriptions. This is why those who do not share the same views rightly hold those voters and the person they helped to elect responsible for the measures enacted during his or her term in office.
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Sunday, September 23, 2012 - 9:55am
If a Million People March for Catalan Independence in Barcelona, Do They Make Noise?
On September 11th, over a million people took to the streets in a European city that has, in recent years, become one of the more popular tourist destinations in the world. And as anyone who has was there to witness the run-up to the event in recent weeks and months knows, this was no routine exercise in blowing off steam.
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Saturday, September 22, 2012 - 10:37am
Recognizing the Importance of Goldwater, or Learning to Analyze and Practice Progressive Politics in their Historical Dimension
If you get a chance, you should take a look at the debate between Glen Ford and Michael Eric Dyson that aired as part of the September 7th edition of Amy Goodman’s Democracy Now (video below). The extended interchange is valuable for many reasons. The most immediately evident of these is that it “breaks the silence”, as Amy likes to say, on the enormous disdain that many liberals and progressives feel for Obama and his policies.
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Tuesday, July 24, 2012 - 7:12am
Aggressive Cluelessness: Then and Now
At the middle of the 16th century, Spain was the unquestioned superpower of the world, presiding over an empire more geographically expansive (comprised of the Philippines, much of today’s Latin America, most of today’s of Holland, Belgium, Austria and Germany as well as considerable portions of Italy and France) than any previous nation in history.
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Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 12:12pm
No, It Has Not 'Always Been This Way'
One of the more common responses I get when I try to point out the alarming decline of basic civic values and practices in the US is one version or another of the following: "What are you getting so excited about? It is a dog eat dog world today, just as it has been for the entire trajectory of the human race. The powerful have always sought to fully exploit their ability to toy with the lives of “lesser beings”.
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Sunday, March 11, 2012 - 1:37pm
“Mistakes Were Made”: One-Time Object of Derision Now a Core Template of Our Social Behaviors
Though I was fairly young at the time, I will always remember the moment in the Spring of 1973 when Nixon’s Press Secretary, Ron Ziegler, tried to explain away his and his bosses previous lies about the fast-progressing Watergate scandal with the words, “mistakes were made”.
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Sunday, February 19, 2012 - 12:27pm
If the Cords of Culture are Cut, How Will We Access the Potential Sources of Our Renewal?
This past week, I had the pleasure of teaching the Last Supper , Tomás Gutiérrez Alea’s 1976 masterpiece, to a group of very bright and conscientious undergraduate students.
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