Jim Horn

Jim Horn is Professor of Educational Leadership at Cambridge College, Cambridge, MA. He is also an education blogger at Schools Matter @ the Chalkface and has published widely on issues related to education reform and social justice in education. With co-author, Denise Wilburn, his new book, The Mismeasure of Education, was published in July 2013.

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - 7:11am
Addiction to High Stakes Testing is Killing US Education
Diane Ravitch, for whom I have a great deal of respect for leading the charge against the Billionaire Boys’ Club in recent years, has written on her blog that she is agnostic on the national curriculum standards project known as the Common Core. Ravitch reasons that
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Wednesday, May 2, 2012 - 2:13pm
NCLB Tutoring Fraud Part of Larger Pattern of Privateering
If there are any educational historians around in a hundred years to examine the records from this generation of corporate reform efforts to privateer public schools into corporate revenue streams, No Child Left Behind will stand out, no doubt, as one of the most useful tools in their arsenal. To those less disposed to celebrate the demise of democratic institutions, NCLB has, thus far anyway, proved itself as the most expensive, toxic, and damaging federal education policy in the nation’s history.
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Sunday, February 5, 2012 - 11:13am
Wild Dreams: Anonymous, Arne Duncan, and High-Stakes Testing
Last night I was re-reading a terrific little book from 1976 by Don Martin, George Overholt, and Wayne Urban: Accountability in American Education: A Critique . The book brings so many elements of the current edu-mess into focus, while giving a long view of history.
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Friday, January 20, 2012 - 10:59am
On US Education: It’s the Socioeconomic Segregation, Stupid
In a piece for The Nation last week, Linda Darling-Hammond demolished most of the remaining chunks of any size within the crumbling structure of corporate education’'s most ironically-titled reform ever --No Child Left Behind.
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Sunday, January 8, 2012 - 12:30pm
High Test Scores Make Happy People
Much ado is being made about an economics-in-education study hailed as “new” by the New York Times , even though the Times reporter indicates that findings were presented at “more than a dozen seminars” during the past year. No specifics on that, and none are cited on the very current CV by lead author of the study and newest and youngest Harvard rock star economist, Raj Chetty.
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Sunday, November 13, 2011 - 12:13pm
NY Times Continues to Blame Schools and Teachers for Poverty and Penury
The Business Roundtable's Rube Goldberg plan for evaluating teachers in Tennessee (and other venues with RTTT money) has met with almost universal disdain, a response that has brought CEOs running out of their penthouses to dictate responses for the corporate media editorial pages.
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Monday, November 7, 2011 - 7:37am
New Charter School Study More Bad News for Corporate Ed Reform
The first national charter school study was conducted in 2009 by CREDO at Stanford , and the co-funders of the study (the Walton Foundation and Pearson) were not enamored by the results.
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Tuesday, November 1, 2011 - 7:57am
'Teachers Want Corporate America Assessed'
It has been more than a week ago since I stood in Times Square penned in behind barricaded fences in a sea of tens of thousands protesters at the Occupy Wall Street rally.
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Saturday, September 24, 2011 - 6:16am
Using Federal Power to Resegregate American Schools
Prior to passage of the Elementary and Secondary Act (ESEA) in 1965, a savvy Lyndon Johnson, who knew the South would never willingly desegregate schools, crafted the federal legislation so that large sums of money would go to any of the segregated systems of the South that would comply with the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which, of course, banned racial discrimination in any public institution receiving federal funds.
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Thursday, March 31, 2011 - 10:02am
Cash Incentives: Yet Another Way to Destroy Quality Education
The social impact of high stakes testing in poor urban schools has grown particularly acute over the past 10 years. For beyond the shrinkage of school curriculums to fit the narrow boundaries of annual tests, along with the disappearance of recess and play, research in poorer schools has uncovered another most tragic outcome to high stakes testing: the effective elimination of care as the ethos that has bound together teacher and child for longer than there have been schools in America.
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