Fran Quigley

Fran Quigley is a professor at Indiana University McKinney School of Law, where he directs the Health and Human Rights Clinic. He is the author of How Human Rights Can Build Haiti (Vanderbilt University Press) and co-authored a friend of the court brief in support of the plaintiffs in Georges v. United Nations.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, February 9, 2016 - 10:30am
Hammer of Justice: Heartland Peace Activist Facing Felonies for Breaking Northrup Grumman Windows
Jessica Reznicek, 34, an Iowa peace activist, was arraigned yesterday and charged with two felonies for breaking three windows with a sledgehammer at the Northrup Grumman facility outside the Omaha Nebraska Strategic Air Command at Offut Air Force base. After her court appearance she was returned...
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Friday, February 5, 2016 - 1:45pm
Corporations Killed Medicine. Here’s How to Take It Back.
Along the path toward the creation of a global capitalist system, some of the most significant steps were taken by the English enclosure movement. Between the 15 th to 19 th centuries, the rich and the powerful fenced off commonly held land and transformed it into private property. Land switched...
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Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 8:30am
Is the TPP the Bull Connor Moment for Access to Medicines?
Earlier this month, the representatives of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP) parties announced they had concluded five years of negotiations by agreeing to final terms . Simply put, the TPP is designed to block the sick and the poor from accessing affordable generic and biosimilar...
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Tuesday, January 20, 2015 - 1:45pm
Haitian Cholera Victims Undaunted by Court Ruling of UN Immunity
Earlier this month, on the eve of the 5th anniversary of Haiti’s tragic earthquake, a U.S. District Court judge ruled against Haitians’ class action suit asking the United Nations to take responsibility for the deadly cholera epidemic it triggered in October of 2010. Viewed from both narrow and...
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Friday, October 10, 2014 - 8:15am
From Cradle to Grave, the US Protected Jean-Claude Duvalier
In February of 2013, I stood in a sweaty, overcrowded Port-au-Prince courtroom and watched as Jean-Claude Duvalier answered questions about hundreds of his political opponents being arrested, imprisoned, and killed during his tenure as Haiti’s “President for Life.” Many of Duvalier’s rivals were...
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Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 2:27pm
How the US Turned Three Pacifists into Violent Terrorists
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Friday, April 12, 2013 - 7:35am
Things Are Difficult: A Post-Earthquake Disaster in Haiti
At first, Yvonne Jolivan does not have an answer to my question.
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Friday, March 1, 2013 - 7:02am
Free Michael Posner: The US Holds the Key to Duvalier Prosecution
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – I am in the courtroom for a hearing on the cases charging that Jean-Claude Duvalier committed massive human rights violations during his tenure as Haiti’s president from 1971 to 1986. The courtroom is mobbed—black-robed lawyers, TV cameramen shining lights straight onto the panel of judges, and viktims of Duvalier’s murderous regime all jostle for space. It is a big day.
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Monday, December 31, 2012 - 7:59am
How Human Rights Can Save Haiti
Last month, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced a new initiative to address the cholera epidemic in Haiti. The plan includes a variety of measures, most notably the building of desperately-needed water and sanitation infrastructure.
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Sunday, September 16, 2012 - 1:46pm
Haitian Political Prisoner Released From Prison, Says Repression Likely to Continue
Two weeks ago, a weary looking yet jubilant David Oxygène stepped out of the prison building into a throng of supporters. The Haitian political activist was released after over two months in prison since he was arrested on June 19, 2012, during one of his group’s weekly Port-au-Prince demonstrations in front of the Ministry of Social Affairs, calling on the Martelly government for work and better social policies for Haiti’s poor.
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