Fran Quigley

Fran Quigley is an Indianapolis attorney working on local and international poverty issues. His column appears in The Indianapolis Star every other Monday.

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, May 15, 2013 - 2:27pm
How the US Turned Three Pacifists into Violent Terrorists
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Friday, April 12, 2013 - 7:35am
Things Are Difficult: A Post-Earthquake Disaster in Haiti
At first, Yvonne Jolivan does not have an answer to my question.
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Friday, March 1, 2013 - 7:02am
Free Michael Posner: The US Holds the Key to Duvalier Prosecution
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti – I am in the courtroom for a hearing on the cases charging that Jean-Claude Duvalier committed massive human rights violations during his tenure as Haiti’s president from 1971 to 1986. The courtroom is mobbed—black-robed lawyers, TV cameramen shining lights straight onto the panel of judges, and viktims of Duvalier’s murderous regime all jostle for space. It is a big day.
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Monday, December 31, 2012 - 7:59am
How Human Rights Can Save Haiti
Last month, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced a new initiative to address the cholera epidemic in Haiti. The plan includes a variety of measures, most notably the building of desperately-needed water and sanitation infrastructure.
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Sunday, September 16, 2012 - 1:46pm
Haitian Political Prisoner Released From Prison, Says Repression Likely to Continue
Two weeks ago, a weary looking yet jubilant David Oxygène stepped out of the prison building into a throng of supporters. The Haitian political activist was released after over two months in prison since he was arrested on June 19, 2012, during one of his group’s weekly Port-au-Prince demonstrations in front of the Ministry of Social Affairs, calling on the Martelly government for work and better social policies for Haiti’s poor.
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Monday, July 23, 2012 - 6:57am
Echoes of Duvalier in Martelly's Haiti
An unrelenting sun beats down on the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince, and sweat pours off the three dozen men and handful of women who sing, dance, and wave home-made signs as they block the entrance to the government Ministry of Social Affairs.
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Sunday, December 11, 2011 - 10:53am
Haitian Cholera Victims to UN: Practice What You Preach
RIVYE KANO, Haiti -- Gathered silently in the shade of a mango tree here, dozens of people patiently wait their turn to tell us about the horror that descended on their community a year ago. Shortly after drinking from the local water source, entire families started to get violently ill with diarrhea and vomiting. It was an outbreak of cholera, the vicious waterborne disease that can kill within hours.
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Sunday, July 3, 2011 - 11:02am
Witness to Broken Promises in Haiti
PORT AU PRINCE, HAITI. What if one of our notorious Hoosier storms violently destroyed your entire neighborhood, killing scores, and leaving you and your neighbors homeless and penniless? Imagine that the immediate reaction to this disaster was inspiring, with celebrity-packed telethons being broadcast, leaders of state pledging to rebuild, and rich and poor alike donating to your recovery.
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Monday, May 3, 2010 - 10:10am
Johnsen, Constitution Both Denied Role in Obama Administration
Last month, Indiana University Maurer School of Law Professor Dawn Johnsen withdrew as the nominee to head the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel. Johnsen's statement cited "lengthy delays and political opposition," and indeed several Senators openly opposed her nomination, including Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama, the Senate Judiciary Committee's ranking Republican member. But Johnsen may have faced less obvious barriers as well.
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Tuesday, December 16, 2008 - 9:36am
Nigerians Get Their Day in Court On Human Rights Claims Against Oil Companies
If IkpoBari Senewo had not been conducting an exam for his secondary school students in the Niger Delta village of Bane one afternoon in May of 1994, he believes he would have been killed. As it was, members of the Nigerian military who came to Senewo's house that day found only his father at home, so they flogged the elderly man with a section of high-tension cable and then burned the house down.
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