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North Korean missile test on television

A woman walks past a television screen showing a news broadcast with file footage of a North Korean missile test, at a railway station in Seoul on January 30, 2022, after North Korea fired a "suspected ballistic missile" in the country's seventh weapons test this month according to the South's military. (Photo: Jung Yeon-je/AFP via Getty Images)

North Korea, Perpetual Victim of the US Military-Industrial Complex

North Korea's demands for an agreement to eliminate their nuclear weapons are to end the truce and sign a peace treaty, finally ending the Korean War after nearly 70 years, stop the war games on its borders, and lift the punishing sanctions that are so destructive to the health and wellbeing of its people.

Alice Slater

It seems hard to believe that in these possible end times in the midst of a global pandemic with an endless succession of catastrophic climate disasters and thousands of nuclear weapons poised and pointed in the U.S. and Russia, ready to destroy life on earth, we are beset by a bought, corrupted mainstream media that assaults us with the "wrongdoings" of Russia and China, and most recently North Korea, with barely a mention in their assaultive reporting of how the U.S. might be the cause in the matter.  Nor do they report on the many remedies that have been rejected by the United States in its drive for global domination. Instead of promoting the critical opportunities we must now seize—all nations and peoples of the world—to work cooperatively to save Mother Earth, the western news reports serve up a steady daily diet of the harm that could be inflicted upon an innocent United States, echoing shades of the dreadful 1950s McCarthy Era in a new Cold War II and maybe World War III. 

Kim is waving his missiles again to get our attention.

North Korea is a case in point.  Recent reports in The New York Times noted a series of renewed missile tests by North Korea and reported that for the first time, a veto in the UN Security by Russia and China blocked additional harsh sanctions proposed by the U.S. on that poor, struggling nation. In its report, the Times quoted John Delury, professor of history at Yonsei University, South Korea as saying "no amount of sanctions could create the pressures that covid-19 created in the past two years. Yet do we see North Korea begging and saying, 'take our weapons and give us some aid'...the North Koreans will eat grass," he said, rather than give up their nuclear weapons. But this callous evaluation ignores the long, sorry history of failed negotiations between the U.S. and North Korea.

North Korea has been testing its missiles and developing nuclear weapons since it walked out of the Non-Proliferation Treaty in 1973 claiming that the U.S. had singled it out as a target of a pre-emptive nuclear attack and had threatened it with a blockade and military punishment. It now has about 40 to 50 nuclear weapons of the 14,000 nuclear weapons on the planet today, with 13,000 of them in the US and Russia, and the remainder in China, UK, France, India, Pakistan, and Israel. North Korea was the only nuclear-armed country to vote in the U.N. Committee for Disarmament in favor of negotiations to go forward on the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. At that historic meeting where the nations of the world voted 122 in favor of negotiations on a new treaty to ban the bomb, India, China, and Pakistan abstained and the U.S., Russia, U.K., France, Israel, and all the states under the U.S. nuclear umbrella voted No. This unique affirmative vote of North Korea, trying to get the world's attention for ending the isolation and punishment it has suffered over the years, went totally unreported in the press.  

During the negotiations with Trump and South Korea, in 2019 North Korea was willing to agree to forego its nuclear bomb program if it could get a peace treaty instead of the truce it has been living under since 1953, faced with 38,000 U.S. troops situated near its border conducting war games with South Korea, not to mention the cruel and killing sanctions that deny food, fuel, medications to its people. Trump in his desire to look good and get a deal offered to withdraw 10,000 of the US troops stationed there all these years. Both the Democrats and Republicans in Congress blocked him from making that deal, Biden never followed up, and Kim is waving his missiles again to get our attention.

North Korea's demands for an agreement to eliminate their nuclear weapons are to end the truce and sign a peace treaty, finally ending the Korean War after nearly 70 years, stop the war games on its borders, and lift the punishing sanctions that are so destructive to the health and wellbeing of its people. This would finally allow free travel back and forth from the U.S. and South Korea that has been so heartbreaking for separated families that haven't been able to cross the line to visit and see relatives and friends for decades. 


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.
Alice Slater

Alice Slater

Alice Slater, author and nuclear disarmament advocate, is a member of the Coordinating Committee of World Beyond War and UN NGO Representative of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.

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