Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

The rights of nature represents necessary legal and cultural shifts in which we understand ourselves as part of nature, and not, as Colombia’s Constitutional Court explained, "a ruler of nature." (Photo: Jim Liestman/Flickr/cc)

The rights of nature represents necessary legal and cultural shifts in which we understand ourselves as part of nature, and not, as Colombia’s Constitutional Court explained, "a ruler of nature." (Photo: Jim Liestman/Flickr/cc)

Legal Rights of the Natural World: Beyond Personhood

By becoming a bearer of rights, nature is now being thrust into the murky realm of legal personhood.  

Mari Margil

What does it mean to be a person, legally? 

Aren’t people persons? Yes.

But, are only people persons? Most definitely not.

A human being is considered a "natural" person under the law, whereas certain other entities, including corporations and ships, are considered “legal” or “artificial” persons. Black’s Law Dictionary defines a legal person as an entity with “its own rights and duties.” 

What we find is that under the law, there are either persons capable of having rights, or property (things), “over which rights may be exercised.”

When the U.S. Constitution was ratified, women, indigenous peoples, and slaves were treated as property, without rights. 

Nature is still considered to be property under the law, but that is beginning to change, thanks to the Rights of Nature movement. 

In 2006, the first law recognizing legal rights of nature was adopted in Tamaqua Borough, Pennsylvania. It was the first such law not only in the United States, but in the world. Communities across ten states have since followed suit. 

In 2008, Ecuador enshrined legal rights of nature—or Pacha Mama—in its constitution. Bolivia now has a national law in place, as does Uganda.

Over the past several years, courts in India, Bangladesh, and Colombia have determined that rivers and other ecosystems possess legal rights. This includes a decision by Colombia’s Constitutional Court, which ruled that the Atrato River is a “subject of rights,” including rights to “protection, conservation, maintenance, and restoration.”

This movement to recognize rights of nature follows decades of environmental laws which treat nature as property, and thus as right-less under the law. Treating ecosystems as property, environmental laws have historically regulated the use or exploitation of the natural world, such as laws which authorize fracking, drilling, and other uses of nature. 

The consequences are proving catastrophic, including the bleaching and die-off of the world’s coral reefs, species extinction levels well beyond natural background rates, and, of course, an accelerating climate crisis.

But a shift is underway to transform nature from being right-less property to bearing rights itself, in what the Colombia court described as a necessary “step forward in jurisprudence.”  

Yet, by becoming a bearer of rights, nature is now being thrust into the murky realm of legal personhood. 

For example, since 2014, New Zealand’s Parliament has codified several landmark legal settlements between indigenous peoples and the national government, which establish that the Whanganui River and other ecosystems have rights, as well as the “powers, duties, and liabilities of a legal person.”

Then, in 2017, the State of Uttarakhand’s high court in northern India ruled the Ganges and Yamuna Rivers are “legal persons” with “all corresponding rights, duties and liabilities of a living person.” The rivers are suffering significant degradation from pollution, industry, and other human activity.

Together, these represent important developments in the movement to secure legal rights of the natural world.

However, in its appeal of the decision to the India Supreme Court, the state government asks what happens if the river floods and someone dies, can state officials – named “in loco parentis” (effectively as guardians of the rivers) – be held responsible?

Can we hold a river liable for flooding? Or the climate accountable for rising ocean temperatures? The answer is “no.” So, does that mean rivers or other ecosystems are unable to possess rights? The answer again is “no.”

Legal personhood is a doctrine which arose to address human rights and responsibilities. 

Ecosystems are not human, and they certainly don’t bear human responsibilities. Rather, nature requires its own unique rights that recognize its needs and characteristics.

As there is growing agreement among lawmakers and courts across the globe that it is time to recognize nature as possessing rights, legal systems need to evolve as well. This means moving beyond legal personhood.

The future will recognize the rights of ecosystems. As it does, a new framework is needed in which legal and judicial systems are equipped to properly implement and enforce the rights that nature needs to be healthy and thrive. This new framework - legal naturehood – would focus on upholding the legal rights of nature, such as those found in Ecuador’s Constitution, including rights to exist, regenerate, evolve, and be restored. Implementation means ensuring human activities do not violate the rights of nature, and that our actions become consistent with those rights. 

For instance, to implement the Colombia ruling recognizing rights of the Atrato River, the court instructed the government to work with the indigenous peoples in the river basin to restore the river and realize the promise that legal rights afford. 

The rights of nature represents necessary legal and cultural shifts in which we understand ourselves as part of nature, and not, as Colombia’s Constitutional Court explained, “a ruler of nature.”

Much like in Galileo’s time in which we were forced to accept that the sun does not revolve around the earth, today we must realize that the natural world does not revolve around us. In this fiftieth anniversary year of the moon landing, perhaps it is time that we once again reconsider our place in the universe.


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.
Mari Margil

Mari Margil

Mari Margil is Executive Director of the Center for Democratic and Environmental Rights where she leads the international rights of nature work.

This is the world we live in. This is the world we cover.

Because of people like you, another world is possible. There are many battles to be won, but we will battle them together—all of us. Common Dreams is not your normal news site. We don't survive on clicks. We don't want advertising dollars. We want the world to be a better place. But we can't do it alone. It doesn't work that way. We need you. If you can help today—because every gift of every size matters—please do. Without Your Support We Simply Don't Exist.

Patient Group Targets Pair of Democrats for 'Selling Us Out to Drug Companies'

"It makes me so angry that members of Congress are choosing Big Pharma over patients. It's unforgivable."

Jake Johnson ·


Judge Blocks Biden From Continuing 'Inhumane' Trump Policy to Deport Families

"This is not the end of the battle against this practice," said one rights group, "but it is a major step to ensure that the U.S. welcomes these asylum-seeking families—as we should."

Jessica Corbett ·


400+ Economists Press Congress to Permanently Expand Child Tax Credit

Such an expansion would "dramatically reduce childhood poverty in the United States," they said.

Andrea Germanos ·


Biden Admin. Sued for Letting Big Oil Harass 'Imperiled' Polar Bears

"We're hopeful the court will overturn this dangerous rule that puts polar bears in the crosshairs."

Jessica Corbett ·


'Cruel and Callous': Biden Slammed for Resuming Deportations to Battered Haiti

"Hours after the 7.2 magnitude earthquake, President Joe Biden released a statement saying that the United States was a 'friend' of Haiti. A 'friend' does not continuously inflict pain on another friend," said Guerline Jozef of the Haitian Bridge Alliance.

Kenny Stancil ·

Support our work.

We are independent, non-profit, advertising-free and 100% reader supported.

Subscribe to our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values.
Direct to your inbox.

Subscribe to our Newsletter.


Common Dreams, Inc. Founded 1997. Registered 501(c3) Non-Profit | Privacy Policy
Common Dreams Logo