Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

In an article published on Thursday, Folha—which has over 5.7 million followers on Facebook—noted that over the past several months it had begun to detect a sharp decline in interactions not just with its own Facebook posts, but with those of other major Brazilian newspapers as well. (Photo: Legal Loop)

Accusing Facebook of 'Effectively Banning Professional Journalism,' Brazil's Largest Paper Ditches Platform

Facebook has become "inhospitable terrain for those who want to offer quality content," said Folha de S. Paulo's executive editor

Jake Johnson

Accusing Facebook of discriminating against "quality" content and accelerating the spread of "fake news" with its newly-unveiled algorithm, Brazil's largest newspaper Folha de S. Paulo—which boasts a print and online subscriber base of 285,000 people—has announced that it will no longer publish its articles on the social media platform.

"Facebook became inhospitable terrain for those who want to offer quality content like ours."
—Sérgio Dávila, Folha de S. Paulo

"In effectively banning professional journalism from its pages in favor of personal content and opening space for 'fake news' to proliferate, Facebook became inhospitable terrain for those who want to offer quality content like ours," Sérgio Dávila, Folha's executive editor, said in a statement.

In an article published on Thursday, Folha—which has over 5.7 million followers on Facebook—noted that over the past several months it had begun to detect a sharp decline in interactions not just with its own Facebook posts, but with those of other major Brazilian newspapers as well.

By contrast, the newspaper's analysis found, "fake news pages received five times the number of engagements that professional journalism received."

For this decline in engagement, Folha blamed Facebook's new algorithm, which the paper said "privilege[s] personal interaction contents, to the detriment of those distributed by companies, such as those that produce professional journalism."

"This reinforces the tendency of the user to consume more and more content with which it has affinity, favoring the creation of bubbles of opinions and convictions, and the propagation of fake news," Folha argued. "These problems have been aggravated in recent years by the mass distribution of deliberately false content...as happened in the U.S. presidential election in 2016."

The decision to abandon Facebook was ultimately "a reflection of internal discussions about the best ways to get the content of the newspaper to reach its readers," the paper concluded. "The disadvantages of using Facebook as a path to this distribution became more evident after the social network's decision to reduce the visibility of professional journalism on its users' pages."

Responding to Folha's move, Jeff Benício, a columnist for the Brazilian news and entertainment website Terra, urged other organizations to do the same.

"Other news organizations should follow Folha de S. Paulo's footsteps," Benício wrote. "If there's a mass exit, the social network will lose relevance and become...a virtual space for family and friends to joke around."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

Massive Demonstration of Support for Lopez Obrador in Mexico City

AMLO was elected in 2018 and heralded as the Bernie Sanders of Mexico

Common Dreams staff ·


Scientists Revive ‘Zombie’ Virus After 50,000 Years Trapped in Siberian Permafrost

Researchers documented 13 never-before-seen viruses that have been lying dormant, frozen in thick ice, over tens of thousands of years.

Common Dreams staff ·


'Cleaner Air Is Coming' as London Expands Vehicle Pollution Fee to Entire Metro Area

"Around 4,000 Londoners die prematurely each year because of long-term exposure to air pollution, with the greatest number of deaths in outer London boroughs," noted Mayor Sadiq Khan in announcing the expansion.

Brett Wilkins ·


'Amazing News': Historic Shark Protections Approved at Global Wildlife Convention

Up to 90% of sharks targeted by the lucrative fin trade will now be protected, said one advocate.

Julia Conley ·


'The Nightmare Materializes': Far-Right Extremist Itamar Ben-Gvir to Be Israel's National Security Minister

The Foreign Affairs Ministry of the Palestinian Authority said Ben-Gvir's elevation to national security minister could have a "catastrophic impact on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict."

Jake Johnson ·

Common Dreams Logo