Skip to main content

Sign up for our newsletter.

Quality journalism. Progressive values. Direct to your inbox.

SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - JULY 04: People watch a television broadcast reporting the North Korean missile launch at the Seoul Railway Station on July 4, 2017 in Seoul, South Korea. North Korea fired an unidentified ballistic missile on Tuesday from a location near the North's border with China into waters at Japan's exclusive economic zone, east of the Korean Peninsula, according to reports. The latest launch have drawn strong criticism from the U.S. and came ahead of a summit of leaders from the Group of 20 countries in Germany later this week. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)

'Scary as Hell': Trump Response to North Korea Sparks Fear of Escalation

"We are literally at the point were we have to hope that a guy who is obviously crazy, Kim Jong-un, is less crazy than the U.S. President."

Jake Johnson

Following North Korea's announcement on Tuesday that it had for the first time successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM)—one it claimed could "target any part of the world"—President Donald Trump continued his bizarre use of social media as a weapon by launching a series of tweets described by commentators as "insane," "unintelligible," and "scary as hell."

"[Trump] could literally get us into a war with his tweets."
—Laura Rosenberger, former State Department official‏

"Does this guy have anything better to do with his life?" Trump wrote, referring to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, before casually floating the idea that "perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all!"

Experts were unsure whether the launch actually demonstrated the missile's capacity to reach "any part of the world."

"It appears the test was successful. If launched on a standard angle, the missile could have a range of more than 8,000 km," Kim Dong-yub, a military expert at Kyungnam University's Institute of Far Eastern Studies in Seoul," told Reuters. "But we have to see more details of the new missile to determine if North Korea has acquired ICBM technology."

As CNN noted, Kim Jong-un appears to have timed the missile launch "for maximum political effect, giving the order to fire on the eve of the July 4 holiday, just days after US President Donald Trump spoke with Japanese and Chinese leaders about the North Korea threat and before this week's G20 meeting."

That Trump so quickly fell for the bait alarmed analysts and lawmakers, who argued that the president's erratic behavior could further escalate an already deeply troubling situation.

"North Korea clings to nukes [because] it is paranoid it will be invaded," wrote Rep. Ted Lieu (D-Calif.). "Using words like 'end' is exactly the wrong approach."

North Korea's neighbors, meanwhile, called for calm and restraint.

"I have to reiterate that the current situation in the Korean Peninsula is complicated and sensitive," said Geng Shuang, a spokesman for the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs. "We hope all sides concerned can remain calm and restrained so that tensions can be eased as soon as possible."

Given Trump's track record over just six months in office—including his recent "deranged" attacks on the American media—some argued that such restraint will likely not come from the White House.

Former State Department official Laura Rosenberger‏, who worked specifically on issues related to North Korea, warned that Trump is "playing with fire here—nuclear fire."

"Picking a Twitter fight with a nuclear-armed dictator is not wise—this is not reality TV anymore," Rosenberger concluded. "He could literally get us into a war with his tweets."


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0). Feel free to republish and share widely.

We've had enough. The 1% own and operate the corporate media. They are doing everything they can to defend the status quo, squash dissent and protect the wealthy and the powerful. The Common Dreams media model is different. We cover the news that matters to the 99%. Our mission? To inform. To inspire. To ignite change for the common good. How? Nonprofit. Independent. Reader-supported. Free to read. Free to republish. Free to share. With no advertising. No paywalls. No selling of your data. Thousands of small donations fund our newsroom and allow us to continue publishing. Can you chip in? We can't do it without you. Thank you.

Biden's Student Debt Relief to Cost a Fraction of US Giveaways to the Megarich and Pentagon

"In contrast to President Trump and Republicans who gave giant corporations $2 trillion in tax breaks, President Biden delivered transformative middle-class relief," said two senators.

Jessica Corbett ·


'Climate Change Is the Asteroid,' Say Critics of NASA Earth Defense Mission

"The actual clear and present danger to humanity is of course Earth breakdown from burning fossil fuels," said one NASA climate scientist.

Brett Wilkins ·


After Nearly a Decade in Exile, Snowden Granted Russian Citizenship

While the whistleblower said "a little stability" would benefit his family, one digital rights advocate noted that "if the Biden administration dropped the charges against Snowden, Putin wouldn't be able to use him for a PR stunt."

Jessica Corbett ·


Peace Group Urges US and China to Halt 'Blatantly Provocative' Military Maneuvers

The co-chairs of the Committee for a SANE U.S.-China Policy called on American and Chinese leaders to "immediately take unilateral and bilateral steps to reduce the risk of an accidental or unintended clash."

Brett Wilkins ·


In 'Unprecedented Democratic Exercise,' Cubans Approve Inclusive Family Code

"This is a milestone in the advancement of democracy," said global grassroots coalition Progressive International. "Nowhere in the world has a family law been submitted for public consultation and subject to a referendum."

Julia Conley ·

Common Dreams Logo