Thomas S. Harrington

Thomas S. Harrington

Thomas S. Harrington is professor of Hispanic Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut and the author of Public Intellectuals and Nation Building in the Iberian Peninsula, 1900–1925: The Alchemy of Identity (Bucknell University Press, 2014).

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, June 22, 2011
Barcelona Chronicle: Last Week’s 'Siege' of the Catalan Parliament
The Catalan Parliament is located in a gated park in the middle of the city of Barcelona, a space that I often cross on my morning walk to work. Last Wednesday, when I got to the entrance I usually use, I was told that I could not go in. So, I began walking around the perimeter of the park. I can’t say I was ready for what I saw.
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Saturday, June 18, 2011
Sooner or Later Our Children Will Ask: "How Did This Happen?"
That it hasn’t happened yet, continues to amaze me. But sooner or later it will. Sooner or later our children, saddled with our debts, our endless wars and the ever more onerous demands of a predatory “national security state”, will turn to us in large numbers and ask how it happened. They will want to know how the many millions of us who were lucky enough to grow up in the American middle class of the 1960s and 1970s, let it come to this.
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Friday, June 10, 2011
The Death of Jorge Semprun
Though the mainstream American press apparently doesn’t see it that way, one of the more extraordinary figures of 20th century died a few days ago in Paris. His name was Jorge Semprun. The son of a prominent Republican leader in Spain (and the grandson of the father of Spain's modern conservative movement), Semprun was exiled to France during the Spanish Civil War.
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Sunday, April 24, 2011
Language, "Promontory Views" and American Perceptions of the World
Imagine for a moment that you were preparing for a fact-finding trip to a foreign country and that you had to choose between background reports produced by two competing informants.
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Sunday, March 06, 2011
Controversialization: A Key to the Right’s Continuing Domination of Public Debates
Yesterday, our local NPR station hosted a debate about what themes should and should not be included in school-sponsored drama productions. The discussion followed a pattern that has become quite familiar on our airwaves within the last three decades.
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Saturday, February 19, 2011
Dignity: An Idea Gone Missing in the Land
Watching the recent coverage of the events in Tunisia and Egypt, I was struck by how often the pro-Democracy activists in those places, like the politically-minded citizens I have known in Spain and Latin America, invoked the concept of “dignity” when asked to explain their motivations. This, in turn, made me realize just how seldom we hear the term in today’s America.
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Friday, February 18, 2011
America the Baroque
The term Baroque was coined in the Iberian Peninsula--it is said to come from the Portuguese term for deformed pearl--to speak of the ornate cultural products generated in Spain and Portugal during the time when both nations (they were actually joined dynastically between 1580 and 1640) were simultaneously great powers and societies in the throes of self-evident decline and social dislocation. Give or take a few years, the esthetic had its heyday in those places in the period between 1580 and 1700.
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Friday, October 10, 2008
Unequal Charges: When Balanced Is Not Fair
Tuesday morning, National Public Radio and The New York Times had stories about how the presidential campaign is starting to get "rough." The information adduced to justify the assertion is essentially the same in both reports. On the one hand, we learn that Republican John McCain has accused Democrat Barack Obama of cavorting with terrorists based on his serving on a community board with a former member of the Weather Underground. On the other hand, we learn that Obama has pointed out that McCain was a member of the Keating Five.
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