Peter Singer

Peter Singer is a professor of bioethics at Princeton University. His 1975 book Animal Liberation was a touchstone for the animal rights movement. A selection of his many books include: Practical Ethics, How Are We To Live? Ethics in an Age of Self-Interest, One World: The Ethics of Globalization, The Ethics of What We Eat: Why Food Choice Matters, and The President of Good and Evil: Questioning The Ethics of George W. Bush. Singer's most recent book, The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty, is now available.

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, September 06, 2016
Japan's Notorious Dolphin Hunt Is Where the World's Aquariums Shop
The notorious annual dolphin hunt got underway last week in the small Japanese town of Taiji. During the six-month hunting season, terrified dolphins are violently herded into a narrow cove. Most are slaughtered — but scores of “good-looking” ones are captured and shipped off to aquariums. The...
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Monday, August 05, 2013
The World's First Cruelty-Free Hamburger
Eighty years ago, Winston Churchill looked forward to the day when "we shall escape the absurdity of growing a whole chicken in order to eat the breast or wing, by growing these par
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Sunday, January 29, 2012
Are We Ready for a ‘Morality Pill’?
Last October, in Foshan, China, a 2-year-old girl was run over by a van. The driver did not stop. Over the next seven minutes, more than a dozen people walked or bicycled past the injured child. A second truck ran over her. Eventually, a woman pulled her to the side, and her mother arrived. The child died in a hospital. The entire scene was captured on video and caused an uproar when it was shown by a television station and posted online. A similar event occurred in London in 2004, as have others, far from the lens of a video camera.
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Thursday, September 15, 2011
Can We Increase Gross National Happiness?
The small Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan is known internationally for two things: high visa fees, which reduce the influx of tourists, and its policy of promoting “gross national happiness” instead of economic growth. The two are related: more tourists might boost the economy, but they would damage Bhutan’s environment and culture, and so reduce happiness in the long run.
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Thursday, July 14, 2011
Moral Progress and Animal Welfare
Mahatma Gandhi acutely observed that “the greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” To seek to reduce the suffering of those who are completely under one’s domination, and unable to fight back, is truly a mark of a civilized society.
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Sunday, February 13, 2011
Tiger Mothers or Elephant Mothers?
MELBOURNE – Many years ago, my wife and I were driving somewhere with our three young daughters in the back, when one of them suddenly asked: “Would you rather that we were clever or that we were happy?”
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Tuesday, September 14, 2010
If Fish Could Scream
When I was a child, my father used to take me for walks, often along a river or by the sea. We would pass people fishing, perhaps reeling in their lines with struggling fish hooked at the end of them. Once I saw a man take a small fish out of a bucket and impale it, still wriggling, on an empty hook to use as bait.
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Monday, March 08, 2010
Let Wild Animals Be Wild
Last month, at the Sea World amusement park in Florida, a whale grabbed a trainer, Dawn Brancheau, pulled her underwater, and thrashed about with her. By the time rescuers arrived, Brancheau was dead.
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Monday, June 22, 2009
Putting Ethics Before Profits
Something new is happening at Harvard Business School . As graduation nears for the first class to complete their MBA since the onset of the global financial crisis, students are circulating an oath that commits them to pursue their work "in an ethical manner"; "to strive to create sustainable economic, social, and environmental prosperity worldwide"; and
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Tuesday, May 26, 2009
The Value of a Pale Blue Dot
The eighteenth-century German philosopher Immanuel Kant wrote: "Two things fill the heart with ever renewed and increasing awe and reverence, the more often and more steadily we meditate upon them: the starry firmament above and the moral law within."
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