Michael Gould-Wartofsky

Michael Gould-Wartofsky is the author of the new book, The Occupiers: The Making of the 99 Percent Movement (Oxford University Press). He is a PhD candidate in Sociology at New York University. His writing has appeared in the Washington Post, The Nation, Salon, Common Dreams, and Jacobin, along with TomDispatch,  and in the collections Poets Against the War (Nation Books, 2003) and Imagining Iraq (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).  To go to his website, click here. Follow him on Twitter: @mgouldwartofsky

Articles by this author

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Thursday, September 17, 2015
Decriminalize Dissent
September 17 marks the fourth anniversary of Occupy Wall Street, which inspired a new generation of American dissidents and a global wave of protest against economic inequality. Stirred by the Arab Spring, the occupiers rallied an intergenerational, multiracial, cross-class coalition against the...
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Tuesday, May 05, 2015
The Wars Come Home: A Five-Step Guide to the Police Repression of Protest from Ferguson to Baltimore and Beyond
Last week, as Baltimore braced for renewed protests over the death of Freddie Gray , the Baltimore Police Department (BPD) prepared for battle. With state-of-the-art surveillance of local teenagers’ Twitter feeds, law enforcement had learned that a group of high school students was planning to...
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Sunday, March 03, 2013
The Logic of Legalization
The political calculus behind immigration reform was supposed to have changed after the elections of 2012. The outcome of the elections, along with some basic economics, were supposed to have made the logic of legalization all but inevitable, setting the stage for the passage of comprehensive immigration reform early this year.
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Thursday, April 05, 2012
A History of Violence: Trayvon Martin and America's Long History of Legalized Murder
At the Million Hoodie March , the name of Trayvon Martin was the first name on everyone's lips. But as the behoodied masses of mourners spilled into the streets of lower Manhattan, I heard other names, too, which soon joined Martin's in a litany of murdered children. As the names were spoken, sung, chanted, and echoed through the city streets, the assembled remembered a history that was supposed to have been long forgotten.
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Thursday, March 22, 2012
Repress U, Class of 2012: Seven Steps to a Homeland Security Campus
Campus spies. Pepper spray. SWAT teams. Twitter trackers. Biometrics. Student security consultants. Professors of homeland security studies. Welcome to Repress U, class of 2012.
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Sunday, September 11, 2011
America the Amnesiac: On Remembering to Forget on September 11
Never forget. For ten years now, we've repeated the magic words, the gestures, the rituals. Today, of course, we can hardly forget to remember: to return to that luminous Tuesday morning, when the autumn day turned to darkness, and thousands turned to dust. And yet we find, more and more with every passing anniversary, that to remember is to forget. For every thing we are called upon to remember, there is something else we are compelled to forget.
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Thursday, January 10, 2008
Repress U, Class of 2008: How to Build a Homeland Security Campus in Seven Steps
Free speech zones. Taser guns. Hidden cameras. Data mining. A new security curriculum. Private security contractors... Welcome to the new homeland security campus
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Saturday, February 05, 2005
What We Really Owe Iraq Now
Published on Friday, February 4, 2005 by the Harvard Crimson Look, we let those Iraqis have an election! Surely we're bringing freedom and democracy to the Middle East. So intones the neoconservative. Well, we owe it to the Iraqi people to stay there "until the job is done." Such is the liberal line. Yet beyond the pundits, the politicians, and certain Ivy League circles, a majority of both Americans and Iraqis now share a more sensible opinion: The time has come to end the occupation.
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Thursday, August 14, 2003
Young People Are Speaking -- Is Anyone Listening?
I'll be casting my first vote for president in 2004, because I don't know if my generation and the world we were supposed to inherit will survive another four years of the Bush regime intact. There are millions of young Americans who share my sentiments. Yet you probably won't find most 18-year olds at the polls in November. We're tuned in--but when it comes to electoral politics, we're turned off.
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