Jayati Ghosh

Jayati Ghosh is Professor of Economics and currently also Chairperson at the Center for Economic Studies and Planning, School of Social Sciences, at the Jawaharlal Nehru University, in New Delhi, India. With C.P. Chandrasekhar, she co-authored Crisis as Conquest: Learning from East Asia. Jayati is also a contributor to Foreign Policy In Focus. E-mail: jayatijnu@gmail.com

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, August 22, 2017
150 Years of 'Das Kapital': How Relevant Is Marx Today?
It is quite amazing that Karl Marx's Capital has survived and been continuously in print for the past century and a half. After all, this big, unwieldy book (more than 2000 pages of small print in three fat volumes) still has sections that are evidently incomplete. Even in the best translations,...
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Monday, June 04, 2012
Socialism Is Not Dead (Indeed, It Has More to Offer Than Ever)
Even as resistance to global capitalism builds, it tends to be accompanied by gloomy perceptions that grand socialist visions of the future are no longer possible. But there is much more dynamism within the global left than is often perceived, with variegated moves away from tired ideas of all kinds.
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Friday, February 17, 2012
We Need a New World Order at the World Bank
Already the air is thick with rumours, speculation and calculation. No sooner did Robert Zoellick announce that he would step down as president of the World Bank at the end of June than the jockeying for his position began. US treasury secretary Timothy Geithner quickly announced that the US government would put forward a candidate in the coming weeks.
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Saturday, January 21, 2012
Could Ecuador Be the Most Radical and Exciting Place on Earth?
Ecuador must be one of the most exciting places on Earth right now, in terms of working towards a new development paradigm. It shows how much can be achieved with political will, even in uncertain economic times. Just 10 years ago, Ecuador was more or less a basket case, a quintessential "banana republic" (it happens to be the world's largest exporter of bananas), characterized by political instability, inequality, a poorly-performing economy, and the ever-looming impact of the US on its domestic politics.
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Tuesday, August 02, 2011
The Truth About the Global Demand for Food
Ever since the global food crisis of 2007-08, a perception has persisted in many parts of the world that one of the main underlying reasons for the price spikes in major food items – especially food grain – is the increased demand from countries such as China and India. If anything, this perception has become even more widespread since prices started rising again, especially since early 2010.
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Thursday, April 21, 2011
To Make the IMF Relevant Will Take More Than a New Leader
In appearing to veto Gordon Brown's chances of becoming the next head of the International Monetary Fund , David Cameron says the organisation needs someone who "understands the dangers of excessive debt, excessive deficit". But if that is all the new person understands, then he or she will make little difference to an institution badly in need of real reform.
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Friday, March 18, 2011
Disasters and Financial Markets: More Fallout from Japan's Crises
The massive and unfolding tragedy in Japan encapsulates in extreme form the intersection of the three crises that this blog deals with. The unprecedented earthquake and tsunami were obviously unpredictable natural disasters, but they also reflect the growing ecological fragility that is at the heart of the fears about the looming environmental crisis.
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Thursday, July 22, 2010
Still Clinging to Austerity After All These Years
The more things change, the more they really do stay the same. For a while after the global crisis, we were told that the IMF had changed its position with respect to the strict and generally pro-cyclical measures it had been suggesting to countries in the throes of financial or balance of payments crisis. Their economists openly accepted the need for fiscal stimuli and generally counter-cyclical macroeconomic policies to combat the recession.
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Friday, June 11, 2010
Racism and Recession in Europe
Of the many undesirable effects of the ongoing — and increasingly policy-induced — recession in Europe, has received relatively less public attention: the resurgence of racist and xenophobic attitudes. This was already something of a problem, especially in Western Europe in the past decade, when right-wing political forces demanded major restrictions on immigration and sporadic episodes of violence broke out against migrant and Roma groups.
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Monday, May 17, 2010
Greece's Debt Must Be Restructured
It is now clear that the problems of the Greek economy - and the eurozone - have not been and cannot be solved by the large infusion of emergency finance from the ECB and the IMF. The Greek government is being asked to implement austerity measures that will cause a major decline in incomes and employment not just now but in the foreseeable future, and which will not correct the existing imbalances but actually worsen them.
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