Andy Kroll

Andy Kroll is a reporter in the D.C. bureau of Mother Jones magazine and an associate editor at TomDispatch.com.

Articles by this author

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Wednesday, February 19, 2014 - 12:05pm
Spending $100 Million to Save the Planet is a Bad Thing for 'Sugar Daddy' Politics
Move over, Koch brothers. Clear some room, Sheldon Adelson and George Soros. There’s a new billionaire activist on the block.
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Thursday, May 16, 2013 - 11:25am
Billionaires Unchained: The New Pay-As-You-Go Landscape of American “Democracy”
Billionaires with an axe to grind, now is your time. Not since the days before a bumbling crew of would-be break-in artists set into motion the fabled Watergate scandal, leading to the first far-reaching restrictions on money in American politics, have you been so free to meddle.
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Tuesday, October 2, 2012 - 3:03pm
The Death of the Golden Dream of Higher Education
It was the greatest education system the world had ever seen. They built it into the eucalyptus-dotted Berkeley hills and under the bright lights of Los Angeles, down in the valley in Fresno and in the shadows of the San Bernardino Mountains. Hundreds of college campuses, large and small, two-year and four-year, stretching from California's emerald forests in the north to the heat-scorched Inland Empire in the south.
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Monday, June 11, 2012 - 8:06am
Getting Rolled in Wisconsin
The revelers watched in stunned disbelief, cocktails in hand, dressed for a night to remember. On the big-screen TV a headline screamed in crimson red: "Projected Winner: Scott Walker." It was 8:49 p.m. In parts of Milwaukee, people learned that news networks had declared Wisconsin’s governor the winner while still in line to cast their votes. At the election night party for Walker's opponent, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, supporters talked and cried and ordered more drinks.
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Friday, May 18, 2012 - 7:58am
When 'Greed Is Good' and 'Inequality Is Even Better'
Gordon Gekko, the infamously cutthroat capitalist and lead character in Oliver Stone's Wall Street , captured the heady years of the 1980s with a single, indelible line : Greed is good .
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Monday, November 21, 2011 - 8:51am
How the 99% Won in the Fight for Worker Rights
No headlines announced it. No TV pundits called it. But on the evening of November 8th, Occupy Wall Street, the populist uprising built on economic justice and corruption-free politics that’s spread like a lit match hitting a trail of gasoline, notched its first major political victory, and in the unlikeliest of places: Ohio.
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Thursday, October 6, 2011 - 11:08am
Flat-Lining the Middle Class: Economic Numbers to Die For
Food pantries picked over . Incomes drying up. Shelters bursting with the homeless. Job seekers spilling out the doors of employment centers. College grads moving back in with their parents. The angry and disillusioned filling the streets.
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Tuesday, August 23, 2011 - 8:55am
The Badger State's Bloody Stalemate
Stephanie Haw needed a good cry.
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Tuesday, July 5, 2011 - 10:48am
How Racism, Global Economics, and the New Jim Crow Fuel Black America's Crippling Jobs Crisis
Like the country it governs, Washington is a city of extremes. In a car, you can zip in bare moments from northwest District of Columbia, its streets lined with million-dollar homes and palatial embassies, its inhabitants sporting one of the nation's lowest jobless rates, to Anacostia, a mostly forgotten neighborhood in southeastern D.C.
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Monday, May 9, 2011 - 8:14am
How the McEconomy Bombed the American Worker
Think of it as a parable for these grim economic times. On April 19th, McDonald's launched its first-ever national hiring day, signing up 62,000 new workers at stores throughout the country. For some context, that's more jobs created by one company in a single day than the net job creation of the entire U.S. economy in 2009. And if that boggles the mind, consider how many workers applied to local McDonald's franchises that day and left empty-handed: 938,000 of them.
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