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The Parkland Kids Have Triggered Conservative Snowflakes

What explains these defamatory attacks on a bunch of children simply trying to stop their fellow students from being senselessly butchered?

"As the GOP has become composed of characterological extremists, they have become all but incapable of negotiation or compromise." (Screengrab from NBC)

"As the GOP has become composed of characterological extremists, they have become all but incapable of negotiation or compromise." (Photo: Screengrab from NBC)

Over the weekend, the March for Our Lives event featured gigantic rallies across the nation, including one in Washington, D.C., that drew several hundred thousand people — depending on estimates, perhaps the largest single rally there in American history. It was an inspiring demonstration of American citizens exercising their democratic liberties.

But it also badly triggered the hyper-sensitive snowflakes in conservative politics and media, who apparently need a safe space from political assemblies to petition the government for redress of grievances. They have been in continuous meltdown ever since.

Hypocrisy aside, it's a good indication of the political threat they perceive from the post-Parkland gun control movement. The long-term prospects for the extremist views of movement conservatives on gun regulation do not look good.

Let's roll the tape. At National Review, Rich Lowry wrote a post entitled "The Teenage Demagogues" operatically bemoaning how the "braying spirit of the student gun-control advocacy" is "making our public debate even more poisonous and less civil." Why? Because the teenagers (hyperbolically) suggest that the NRA is basically fine with clockwork massacres of schoolchildren, if the alternative is modest regulation of gun manufacturers or restrictions on gun purchases.

Read full column at The Week.

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Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper

Ryan Cooper is a national correspondent at TheWeek.com. His work has appeared in the Washington Monthly, The New Republic, and the Washington Post.

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