Paul Rogers

Paul Rogers

Paul Rogers is professor in the department of peace studies at Bradford University, northern England. He is OpenDemocracy's international-security editor, and has been writing a weekly column on global security since 28 September 2001; he also writes a monthly briefing for the Oxford Research Group. His books include Why We’re Losing the War on Terror (Polity, 2007), and Losing Control: Global Security in the 21st Century (Pluto Press, 3rd edition, 2010). He is on twitter at: @ProfPRogers

Articles by this author

The bomb disposal team of the Afghan Army 215 Corps neutralizes an IED in Sangin, Helmand. Views
Friday, November 10, 2017
Remote War And Public Air
Afghanistan in 2016 saw 11,489 of its civilians killed in armed conflict, according to international observers. This was the highest number since external recording started in 2009. This year is expected to be at least as bad. The fighting season from May-October was particularly intense, with...
Read more
"Major military companies actually need wars—or at least, they need very high states of tension and fear, of the kind which will guarantee increased sales potential," Rogers writes. (Photo: Fibonacci Blue/Flickr/cc) Views
Saturday, August 19, 2017
Arms Bazaar: Needs Wars, Eats lives
It seems to be business as usual in the worldwide "war on terror". The United States military is currently embroiled in many hotspots where violence, fear, and the ever present reality or threat of high explosive are the order of the day. Those conditions mean, for people at the sharp end, multiple...
Read more
People stand next to flowers, candles and a poster reading ‘Pray for Barcelona’ on Las Ramblas. (Photo: Pascal Guyot/AFP/Getty Images) Views
Friday, August 18, 2017
The Barcelona Attack and the Vicious Redundancy of the New Normal
The Barcelona attack followed a pattern that has developed over nearly three years and stems from the start of the intense US-led air war against ISIS which began back in August 2014 . That was instigated by the United States following the taking of Mosul by ISIS and its wider control of much of...
Read more
Views
Friday, July 07, 2017
A World in Trouble: Drought, War, Food, Flight
Six years ago there were fears of a transnational famine developing across much of eastern Africa. At least 11 million people were at risk in what might have been the worst disaster of its kind since the early 1970s (see " A world in hunger: east Africa and beyond ", 21 July 2011). This impending...
Read more
Views
Friday, April 21, 2017
Trump’s Wars: More to Come
A series of accelerating and interlocking security crises, from the Middle East and southwest Asia to North Korea, makes the first months of 2017 an especially perilous time. Increasing the dangers is the way that domestic politics in the United States are coming to shape the Trump’s administration...
Read more
A wind farm in Elan Valley, Wales. Views
Friday, August 12, 2016
Climate Science: Revolution is Here
Heatwaves of more than 50⁰C in Iraq and India in recent weeks are yet further indications that climate disruption is a present-day reality, not something for the future that the world can respond to at leisure. They come in the wake of many months of increasing global temperatures and successively...
Read more
Views
Thursday, July 09, 2015
Islamic State: Why So Resilient?
Ten years after the attacks in London on 7 July 2005 (7/7) and nearly fourteen years after those in New York on 11 September 2001 (9/11) which provoked the "war on terror", there is no end in sight to this long conflict. Today, the proto-caliphate of Islamic State - the latest manifestation of the...
Read more
(Photo: Rueters) Views
Thursday, May 08, 2014
War and Disease: The Case of Polio
Sixty years ago smallpox was endemic across much of the world, killing two million people each year. In 1959 an international programme to eliminate the virus was started, not least because it was a disease amenable to large-scale vaccination. In 1977, the last case was diagnosed and recorded. It...
Read more
'Change is in the air,' writes Rogers, yet 'it involves more than the questioning of capitalism's open-market stage.' (File) Views
Thursday, May 01, 2014
The Global Crisis: Seeing It Whole
There have been many books published about the failures of the global economic system since the onset of the financial crash since 2007-08, but two in particular compel attention. The first is Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett's The Spirit Level (200 9 ), which analysed in great depth the many...
Read more
Views
Thursday, December 13, 2012
Syria, Endgame, and Blowback
The pace of the conflict in Syria is accelerating.
Read more