John B. Quigley

John B. Quigley is a professor of law at Ohio State University. Quigley is active in international human rights work. He has published many articles and books on human rights, the United Nations, war and peace, east European law, African law, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. He is fluent in Russian and French and highly proficient in Spanish and Swahili. He is the author of "Palestine and Israel: A Challenge to Justice"

Articles by this author

Views
Sunday, September 25, 2011
America Should Halt the Use of Unmanned 'Killer' Drones
Armed pilotless drone aircraft are the weapon of choice these days in our military forays into the Middle East. President Barack Obama approved use of drones in Libya last spring. He said they have "unique capabilities." A target is identified through intelligence sources. The information is sent to the command center. Someone sitting in front of a computer screen fires a missile.
Read more
Views
Tuesday, July 20, 2004
The World Court Tells Israel: Tear Down That Wall
Israel ran up against a brick wall at the Hague. Ruling on the legality of the wall Israel is building in the West Bank, International Court of Justice rejected Israel's security rationale. The wall, said the judges of the UN court, violates international law in a variety of ways. The wall must be dismantled. Compensation must be paid to persons whose property or other rights have been infringed so far by the construction.
Read more
Views
Saturday, May 15, 2004
President Bush Ignored War Reality
According to Bob Woodward's book Plan of Attack , President Bush did not give much thought to the consequences of going to war in Iraq. If Woodward is on target, Bush shut his ears when advisors tried to explain that governing Iraq might be more than we could handle. Bush didn't consult, other than to get answers to back his own predilections.
Read more
Views
Monday, September 16, 2002
Iraq Attack Would Breed More Terrorists
If President Bush wants to get the United States attacked again, as in September 2001, he can do no better than to invade Iraq. The widely felt resentment toward the United States in the Middle East that spawned the 2001 attack will only be heightened by military action against Iraq.
Read more