Panama Papers Goes Live with Searchable Database of Tax Evaders

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Panama Papers Goes Live with Searchable Database of Tax Evaders

More than 200,000 documents now available to the public as fallout from last month's leak continues

The Panama Papers database has gone live. (Photo: ICIJ/with overlay)

The Panama Papers database went live on Monday, making more than 200,000 offshore account details available to search online at offshoreleaks.icij.org.

More than 11 million documents were leaked by a whistleblower last month to the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). The data, taken from the Panama-based law firm Mossack Fonseca, linked shell companies, foundations, and trusts to 72 former and current global heads of state.

The Telegraph is posting live updates on its discoveries here.

The release comes as more than 300 economic experts sent a letter to world leaders urging them to abolish the veil of secrecy that surrounds offshore banking and close loopholes that allow the wealthy to avoid paying taxes.

It also follows the publication of a manifesto last week written by the whistleblower, who still goes by the anonymous name John Doe, which slammed "America's broken campaign finance system" and denounced capitalism as "financial slavery."

"In this system—our system—the slaves are unaware both of their status and of their masters, who exist in a world apart where the intangible shackles are carefully hidden amongst reams of unreachable legalese," Doe wrote. "When it takes a whistleblower to sound the alarm, it is cause for even greater concern. It signals that democracy's checks and balances have all failed, that the breakdown is systemic, and that severe instability could be just around the corner."

"Income inequality is the defining issue of our time," Doe wrote.

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