Peter Rothberg

Peter Rothberg writes the ActNow column for the The Nation. ActNow aims to put readers in touch with creative ways to register informed dissent. Whether it's a grassroots political campaign, a progressive film festival, an antiwar candidate, a street march, a Congressional bill needing popular support or a global petition, ActNow will highlight the outpouring of cultural, political and anti-corporate activism sweeping the planet.

Articles by this author

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Friday, June 5, 2009 - 12:27pm
Time to Break Up the Banks
Last April, I wrote about A New Way Forward , a new and growing movement organized via the web and founded by young people who want to take back the power of the ordinary citizen to affect our economic structure. The organization's coming-out party took place last April 11 with more than sixty coordinated events coast to coast all making the case for alternative bailout plans based on the public's interest.
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Sunday, May 3, 2009 - 10:19am
Pete Seeger at 90
In January, on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, Pete Seeger was the oldest person to perform as part of Barack Obama's inauguration festivities. Singing the "greatest song about America ever written" (Bruce Springsteen's words) before 500,000 people live and tens of millions more on television, the then-89-year old legend crooned two little-known verses of his friend Woody Guthrie's 1940 patriotic standard, "This Land is Your Land" -- both about Depress
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Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 9:52am
A New Way Forward: Protesting Against the Wall Street Bailouts
What seems most immediately alarming about the bailouts and the $787 billion stimulus, write Leo Hindery and Donald Riegle in the April 20 issue of The Nation, are the countless indications that the rescue packages still fall woefully short of what is needed to confront the emergency economic conditions we face.
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Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 1:40pm
Stop Mountaintop Removal
In the United States, 100 tons of coal are extracted every two seconds. Around 70 percent of that coal comes from strip mines, and over the last 20 years, an increasing amount comes from mountaintop-removal sites in Appalachia.
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Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 11:23am
Coalition of Immokalee Workers to Crist: End Slavery
At The Nation we've written a lot about the Coalition of Immokalee Workers . The CIW is a worker's organization comprised chiefly of Latino, Haitian and Mayan Indian immigrants who work in Immokalee, Florida, largely as tomato pickers.
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Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 10:43am
Justice for Oscar Grant
From Rodney King to Sean Bell , recent American history has seen far too many examples of police brutality directed against people (usually men) of color. Rarely though, has there been a more chilling, outrageous, seemingly unnecessary instance of abuse than that of Oscar Grant's killing at the Fruitvale BART station in Oakland, California on New Year's Day.
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Tuesday, November 4, 2008 - 11:17am
Combat Vote Suppression
This longest election campaign in American history, soon to be concluded, has seen a record number of new voters registered. In Connecticut, more than 300,000 new voters have added their names to the rolls since January 1, and a higher percentage of registered voters are expected to participate in tomorrow's election than at any time since John F. Kennedy faced off with Richard Nixon in 1960.
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Tuesday, January 1, 2008 - 7:30pm
Don't Forget Iraq
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Thursday, December 6, 2007 - 4:07pm
Media Ownership Fight Moves to Congress
Rutgers University recently hosted the latest in a series of town hall forums being conducted by the two members of the five-person Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) who are opposed to increasing media concentration. The tireless Jonathan Adelstein and Michael Copps have been criss-crossing the country involving the public in a conversation that FCC Commission Chairman Kevin Martin as well as Big Media would rather the citizenry stay out of.
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Saturday, December 1, 2007 - 5:29pm
World AIDS Day
To most casual observers of AIDS, which is to say, most people who haven't known anyone afflicted with HIV, the situation seems to be improving rapidly. While this view is not without foundation when looked at from one (narrow) perspective, the reality is far more complicated and determined by class than most media accounts suggest.
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