Richard Wolff

Richard Wolff

Richard D. Wolff is professor of economics emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he taught economics from 1973 to 2008. He is currently a visiting professor in the graduate program in international affairs of the New School University, New York City. Richard also teaches classes regularly at the Brecht Forum in Manhattan. His books include: Capitalism's Crisis Deepens: Essays on the Global Economic Meltdown(2016); Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism (2012); Occupy the Economy: Challenging Capitalism(2012); Contending Economic Theories: Neoclassical, Keynesian, and Marxian (2012); and Capitalism Hits the Fan: The Global Economic Meltdown and What to Do About It (2009). A full archive of Richard's work, including videos and podcasts, can be found on his site. Follow him on Twitter: @profwolff

Articles by this author

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Tuesday, May 10, 2011
The Great Corporate Tax Swindle
More and more, we hear that nothing can be done to tax major corporations because of the threat of how they would respond. Likewise, we cannot stop their price-gouging or even the government subsidies and tax loopholes they enjoy.
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Monday, March 14, 2011
What's Left of the American Left?
"In contradiction" best describes the American left today. On the one hand, it is fragmented and dispirited, feeling itself distant from the tumble of daily US politics and acutely disgusted by its many-layered corruptions. It hardly knows itself as a part of society, so deep runs its alienation.
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Wednesday, March 02, 2011
How the Rich Soaked the Rest of Us
Over the last half century, the richest Americans have shifted the burden of the federal individual income tax off themselves and onto everybody else.
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Sunday, February 20, 2011
The Real Reason for Public Finance Crisis
Nothing better shows corporate control over the government than Washington's basic response to the current economic crisis. First, we had "the rescue", then "the recovery". Trillions in public money flowed to the biggest US banks, insurance companies, etc. That "bailed" them out (is it just me or is there a suggestion of criminality in that phrase?), while we waited for benefits to "trickle down" to the rest of us.
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Friday, January 28, 2011
The Consequences of Our Tax Cowardice
A national campaign is now fully launched to make local public-sector employees pick up a major share of the costs of economic crisis. Years of rising spending and falling revenue have carved a path of destruction through federal, state and local budgets. Deficits and debts have mounted eroding taxpayer support for government spending in general, and for public employees particularly.
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Thursday, January 20, 2011
Bonuses for Bankers, Bankruptcy for Public Services
So, now we know about the $15bn-plus 2010 pay package for Goldman Sachs partners and employees . The top rungs will get their many millions each , with lesser and lesser amounts going down the GS hierarchy. The mass of its more than 35,000 employees will, as usual, get much, much less than the top.
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Tuesday, January 18, 2011
The Myth of 'American Exceptionalism' Implodes
One aspect of "American exceptionalism" was always economic. US workers, so the story went, enjoyed a rising level of real wages that afforded their families a rising standard of living. Ever harder work paid off in rising consumption. The rich got richer faster than the middle and poor, but almost no one got poorer. Nearly all citizens felt "middle class". A profitable US capitalism kept running ahead of labor supply.
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Saturday, January 01, 2011
2011: Calling Time on Capitalism
An employee of the New Fabris factory, in Chatellerault, central France, walks next to a fire in front of the plant, in 2009, after 366 laid-off workers occupied the factory and threatened to blow it up unless they receive a bigger pay-off. 'We want a bonus' is written on the wall in the background. (Alain Jocard/AFP)
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