Juliet Schor

Juliet Schor

Juliet Schor is Professor of Sociology at Boston College. Before joining Boston College, she taught at Harvard University for 17 years, in the Department of Economics and the Committee on Degrees in Women’s Studies. A graduate of Wesleyan University, Schor received her Ph.D. in economics at the University of Massachusetts. Her books include: "True Wealth: How and Why Millions of Americans Are Creating a Time-Rich, Ecologically Light, Small-Scale, High-Satisfaction Economy" (2011). She is also author of the national best-seller, "The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline of Leisure" (1993) and "The Overspent American: Why We Want What We Don’t Need" (1999). Her other writings are available on her website, Plenitude - the Blog.

Articles by this author

Former Vice President Joe Biden greets guests during a campaign stop at the RiverCenter on October 16, 2019 in Davenport, Iowa. (Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images) Views
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
Open Letter: Dump Trump, Then Battle Biden
Many people, both on the left and more mainstream, are now discussing preparations for the very real possibility that Donald Trump will dispute the results of the election after he has lost. Such concerns are well-founded. But such concerns should not obscure the most urgent task—defeating Trump in...
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Tuesday, September 06, 2011
Less Work, More Living
Millions of Americans have lost control over the basic rhythm of their daily lives. They work too much, eat too quickly, socialize too little, drive and sit in traffic for too many hours, don’t get enough sleep, and feel harried too much of the time.
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Saturday, August 14, 2010
Rethinking Scale and Growth for a More Sustainable World
Despite the lack of policy progress on climate change and ecosystem degradation there is no shortage of solutions currently on offer. While the specifics may differ, those getting most attention share one characteristic-they focus on technological change. Whether it's Pacala et al's wedges, Jeffrey Sachs' plan to reduce carbon emissions through plug in hybrids and carbon capture and storage, McKinsey's cost abatement curve approach, or Jacobson and DeLucchi's 100% renewables by 2030 plan, the emphasis is on technology.
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