Polling on Iran Deal Shows Americans Prefer Diplomacy, Not War

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Common Dreams

Polling on Iran Deal Shows Americans Prefer Diplomacy, Not War

Following the 'historic' deal struck between Iran and the P5+1, US respondents show their support for peaceful solutions

by
Jacob Chamberlain, staff writer

Americans prefer diplomacy to war by an overwhelming 2 to 1 margin, according to a Reuters/Ipsos poll published Tuesday which focused its questions around the recent nuclear deal struck between Iran, the U.S. and the other P5+1 nations.

According to Reuters, 44 percent of those polled in the U.S. were in favor of the diplomatic resolution, with only 22 percent opposed to the deal in which six world powers including the U.S. agreed to see a portion of crippling sanctions against Iran lifted in exchange for a reduction of uranium enrichment and closer monitoring of the country's nuclear energy program.

Despite noted shortcomings, foreign policy analysts, experts and progressives widely came out in support of the deal,  with many calling it a 'historic' boost for peace in the region despite continued threats from Israel to act against Iran unilaterally.

In addition, according to the poll, if the deal falls apart before a final agreement can be made only 20 percent want U.S. military force to be used against Iran, while 31 percent favor further diplomacy and 49 percent said the U.S. should then increase sanctions.

While the poll showed the majority of Americans are generally in support of the state of Israel, 65 percent still agreed with the statement that the United States "should not become involved in any military action in the Middle East unless America is directly threatened." Only twenty-one percent disagreed with that statement.

Overall, as Reuters notes, the poll shows a growing resistance, or weariness, against another U.S. war in the Middle East, "after long, costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan."

"This absolutely speaks to war fatigue, where the American appetite for intervention—anywhere—is extremely low," Ipsos pollster Julia Clark said. "It could provide some support with Congress for the arguments being made by the administration."

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