Salena Tramel

Salena Tramel is a journalist, international policy and development consultant, and PhD researcher.

Articles by this author

Views
Thursday, July 17, 2014 - 6:15am
Gaza Redux: Déjà vu in Occupied Palestinian Territory
The names of four children jutted out from my computer’s screen like daggers on the list of the dead by name as I refreshed it. Memories of children laughing while flying kites on a beach in Gaza flooded my mind. Are these the same Bakr children I knew, and are they now among the 211 dead in Gaza?...
Read more
Views
Thursday, April 17, 2014 - 7:00am
Global Peasant Movement Exemplifies Power of Organized Humanity
Sadly, yet not unlike the inception of many commemorative days, the events that inspired the first International Day of Peasant Struggle were soaked with blood. It was April 17, 1996, a calm day in the northern Brazilian municipality of Eldorado dos Carajás, where the country’s most renowned social...
Read more
Views
Monday, October 14, 2013 - 8:05am
The True Food Prize Goes to the Haitians
The Iowa state capitol is vibrating with activity this week in preparation for the World Food Prize Laureate Award Ceremony that is set to take place on Thursday. The 2013 World Food Prize credits Monsanto in the fight against hunger through sustainable agriculture—yet there is a disconnect between the spirit of the prize and the U.S. agrochemical giant’s actual practices. Organizers of the Food Sovereignty Prize aim to bridge this gap by honoring grassroots social movements in their own ceremony that will take place on Tuesday in New York City.
Read more
Views
Saturday, June 15, 2013 - 1:35pm
Via Campesina and the Fight for Seeds
The U.S. Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Monsanto and its patented seeds last Monday by throwing out a case tirelessly petitioned for by organic farmers. That decision dealt yet another blow to the small-scale agricultural community—it was only last month that the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously affirmed the agricultural giant’s “license agreement” yet again.
Read more
Views
Saturday, June 8, 2013 - 2:06pm
Women of the World’s Largest Peasant Movement Call the Shots
Read more
Views
Monday, March 5, 2012 - 4:03pm
Afghan Elders Describe Cruelest Winter in Charahi Qambar Camp
KABUL—For the residents of the Charahi Qambar refugee camp, it’s been a long five years since they fled the U.S.-led destruction of their villages and put up tents in this destitute Kabul neighborhood. The majority is of Pashtun descent from Afghanistan’s southern Helmand Province, a warlord-torn region notorious for opium production. One would think that the 6,000 internally displaced people (IDPs) camping there for a half-decade have seen it all.
Read more
Views
Saturday, October 15, 2011 - 8:20am
Seed Bank on the West Bank
Hebron (Al-Khalil in Arabic) is home to more than 165,000 Palestinians—making it the largest city in the Palestinian West Bank. The city is famous for leather shoes, avant-garde blown-glass vases and qidreh, a fragrant dish cooked in clay pots. It is also notorious for settler violence in the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians. And now Hebron is becoming increasingly known for an agricultural project that sets the standards for access to food in that city and across the occupied Palestinian territories.
Read more
Views
Thursday, October 13, 2011 - 10:03am
Haitian Movements Branch Out
Away from the televised and broken streets of Port-au-Prince, Haiti hosts some scenic worlds. Down south, there are remnants of cloud forests that fade into blue skies, and in the north cacti twist out of rust desert soil. The eye takes in lime green rice fields in the central valleys that give way to steep rings of mountains. Most of the people who live there are counting on humble rural livelihoods. They find an enormous source of dignity in their peasant identities. Little by little, their work breathes life back into a country that they vow to make self-sustaining once more.
Read more
Views
Saturday, August 20, 2011 - 8:27am
Latest Attacks Bring Fire and Fear to Gaza
Soon after shameful attacks killed six in southern Israel, Prime Minister Netanyahu said that militants would pay “a very heavy price.” And then his warplanes proceeded to pound civilian areas with missiles. So far nine Palestinians—including two children—have been killed, and dozens injured. Retaliatory strikes have not always been limited to sought-after militants but have also affected the more vulnerable and punishable civilian population.
Read more
Views
Thursday, December 30, 2010 - 10:35am
Gaza, Then and Now
Year before last, I was sitting in the living room of my childhood home sharing a cup of morning coffee with my mother and musing over the holidays. We laughed over kitschy Christmas gifts from well-meaning relatives before deciding to turn on the news for five minutes on the brink of another vacation day. Those five minutes would turn out to be one of those times like 9/11-when you never forget exactly where you were when you found out. "Oh no," gasped my mother, tears welling up immediately in her eyes.
Read more

Pages