Madeleine Bunting

Madeleine Bunting is a Guardian columnist and associate editor. She writes on a wide range of subjects including politics, work, Islam, science and ethics, development, women's issues and social change
 

Articles by this author

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Monday, September 12, 2011 - 10:00am
Somalia is Paying a Colossal Price in the War on Terror
In the past three months, 150,000 people have arrived in the Dadaab refugee camp in northern Kenya. About 80% of them are women and children and many have walked 100km to reach the sprawling, crowded camp of 440,000 that now counts as Kenya's third largest city. This is all we can see of Somalia's famine – the ones who manage to get out.
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Friday, April 22, 2011 - 10:22am
The US Swallowed These Cups of Tea to Justify Its Imperial Aims
In the mid-90s an American nurse, Greg Mortenson, was sleeping in his car to save rent so he could fulfil a promise he made to build a school in remote northern Pakistan. Fifteen years later, his book of his epic journey, Three Cups of Tea , has been in the US bestseller list for more than four years; thousands attend his speaker events; he has raised millions for his charity, and built hundreds of schools in the Gilgit-Baltistan region. His book was top of the reading list for US troops deploying to Afghanistan.
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Wednesday, December 29, 2010 - 9:10am
Sudan Must Avoid a Backslide Into All-Out War after January Referendum
Here is unfinished business. The British created the enormous country of Sudan out of a bundle of geographical regions, and bequeathed one of the world's longest civil wars, which was only brought to a grudging halt in 2005.
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Monday, November 1, 2010 - 9:53am
The Giddens Paradox: Understanding Climate Change Too Late
Ten years ago, I ended up on the mud flats of the Nile delta with a water engineer. He explained how everything we could see around us would be under water if sea levels rose as they are predicted to do - the nearby city of Alexandria is one of the most vulnerable to climate change in the world. It was just before a major conference on climate change, and the aim had been to find stories - and images - of global warming that got beyond the cliche of a melting ice cap.
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Monday, December 14, 2009 - 10:02am
Protesters in Seattle Warned Us What Was Coming, but We Didn't Listen
Ten years ago, protesters gathered in a port city; politicians arrived for intense backroom negotiations; the city's hotels were booked out by representatives of thousands of NGOs from all over the world. In 1999 Seattle , like Copenhagen this week, was a big international meeting attempting to exert some governance over globalisation. There's a fitting symmetry that these two meetings bookend this decade.
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Monday, June 30, 2008 - 1:36pm
Pregnancy Should Be a Cause for Cheer, Not a Reason to Fear for Your Life
Fourteen years ago this week, I discovered I was pregnant with my first child. I was nervous -- it was my second pregnancy and I couldn't be sure I wouldn't lose this one -- and I worried what a child might mean for my life. But at least I did not have to worry about losing my life. The lottery of childbirth -- whether a mother would live to see her baby -- ended in my family two generations ago when maternal mortality in the UK dramatically improved in the 1930s.
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Monday, January 28, 2008 - 3:33pm
From Buses to Blogs, a Pathological Individualism Is Poisoning Public Life
A grey weekday morning at 7.40am in Edmonton bus station in north London, and it's teeming with schoolchildren. As the bus arrives, a crowd surge forward to squeeze their way on. People get knocked over. The children, screaming and pushing, panic. Small ones, horrified by the melee, hold back. The ones with the sharpest elbows make it. The rest have to go through the ordeal again with the next bus and the next - and get bad marks for being late when, battle-scarred, they finally make it into school.
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Monday, December 17, 2007 - 4:34pm
Our Tendency to Persecute Others Is As Alive Today As in Medieval Times
Christmas is steeped in nostalgia - that's the point of it. We reminisce about our own past, observe (or rebel against) our family traditions, and fondly assemble a pastiche of European history - a bit of Victoriana and a lot of the middle ages. The Christmas cards arriving on the doormat with their exquisite medieval illuminations, the visits to the medieval churches and cathedrals: Christmas wouldn't be Christmas without fond nods to our medieval past.
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Monday, December 3, 2007 - 2:42pm
Eat, Drink and Be Miserable: The True Cost of Our Addiction to Shopping
There's a pamphlet scudding around my kitchen; it has accumulated coffee rings and fingerprints, but I keep rescuing it from the recycling bin with the good intention of signing up to a green tariff on electricity again. (I can't quite understand why the deal I signed up to years ago ever ended.) A good intention that has a 50-50 chance of fulfilment.
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Monday, November 19, 2007 - 3:31pm
The EU is Bullying the World's Poor to Rush into a Dubious Deal on Trade
Gordon Brown's commitment to Africa has been one of the most consistent themes of his political career, and as he arrives in Kampala, Uganda, at the end of this week for the Commonwealth summit, he might reasonably expect plenty of appreciation and warmth. Instead, what he's likely to face is some intense presidential lobbying that will range from the privately furious to the deeply anxious. What threatens to ambush Brown at the ceremonials is a trade deal with the European Union that has come seriously unstuck.
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